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Blue Brain team discovers a multi-dimensional universe in brain networks–Up to 11 Dimensions

Relevance: 100%      Posted on: June 13, 2017

Public Release: 12-Jun-2017 Blue Brain team discovers a multi-dimensional universe in brain networks Using mathematics in a novel way in neuroscience, the Blue Brain Project demonstrates that the brain operates on many dimensions, not just the 3 dimensions that we are accustomed to Frontiers Caption The image attempts to illustrate something that cannot be imaged -- a universe of multi-dimensional structures and spaces. On the left is a digital copy of a part of the neocortex, the most evolved part of the brain. On the right are shapes of different sizes and geometries in an attempt to represent structures ranging…

Discovery of brain activity in severely brain injured patients who ‘wake up’ with sleep drug

Relevance: 98%      Posted on: November 22, 2013

Contact: Jennifer Gundersen jeg2034@med.cornell.edu 646-317-7402 Weill Cornell Medical College Pattern of brain activity points to possible neural circuit switched on by drug and may identify other patients who could respond NEW YORK (November 19, 2013) -- George Melendez has been called a medical miracle. After a near drowning deprived his brain of oxygen, Melendez remained in a fitful, minimally conscious state until his mother, in 2002, decided to give him the sleep aid drug Ambien to quiet his moaning and writhing. The next thing she knew, her son was quietly looking at her and trying to talk. He has been…

Discovery of brain activity in severely brain injured patients who ‘wake up’ with sleep drug

Relevance: 98%      Posted on: November 22, 2013

Contact: Jennifer Gundersen jeg2034@med.cornell.edu 646-317-7402 Weill Cornell Medical College Pattern of brain activity points to possible neural circuit switched on by drug and may identify other patients who could respond NEW YORK (November 19, 2013) -- George Melendez has been called a medical miracle. After a near drowning deprived his brain of oxygen, Melendez remained in a fitful, minimally conscious state until his mother, in 2002, decided to give him the sleep aid drug Ambien to quiet his moaning and writhing. The next thing she knew, her son was quietly looking at her and trying to talk. He has been…

‘Green Brain’ Project to Create an Autonomous Flying Robot With a Honey Bee Brain

Relevance: 87%      Posted on: October 1, 2012

ScienceDaily (Oct. 1, 2012) — Scientists at the Universities of Sheffield and Sussex are embarking on an ambitious project to produce the first accurate computer models of a honey bee brain in a bid to advance our understanding of Artificial Intelligence (AI), and how animals think. The team will build models of the systems in the brain that govern a honey bee's vision and sense of smell. Using this information, the researchers aim to create the first flying robot able to sense and act as autonomously as a bee, rather than just carry out a pre-programmed set of instructions. If…

Brain parasite directly alters brain chemistry / found in 10-20 per cent of the UK’s population

Relevance: 86%      Posted on: April 28, 2014

Public release date: 4-Nov-2011 A research group from the University of Leeds has shown that infection by the brain parasite Toxoplasma gondii, found in 10-20 per cent of the UK’s population, directly affects the production of dopamine, a key chemical messenger in the brain. Their findings are the first to demonstrate that a parasite found in the brain of mammals can affect dopamine levels. Whilst the work has been carried out with rodents, lead investigator Dr Glenn McConkey of the University’s Faculty of Biological Sciences, believes that the findings could ultimately shed new light on treating human neurological disorders that…

Gelatin accelerates healing of the blood brain barrier in acute brain injury

Relevance: 84%      Posted on: November 7, 2017

Public Release: 6-Nov-2017   Lund University Researchers already know that gelatin-covered electrode implants cause less damage to brain tissue than electrodes with no gelatin coating. Researchers at the Neuronano Research Centre (NRC) at Lund University in Sweden have now shown that microglia, the brain's cleansing cells, and the enzymes that the cells use in the cleaning process, change in the presence of gelatin. "Knowledge about the beneficial effects of gelatin could be significant for brain surgery, but also in the development of brain implants", say the researchers behind the study. Our brains are surrounded by a blood brain barrier which…

Brain-to-brain breakthrough in mind control experiment

Relevance: 84%      Posted on: August 28, 2013

Two minds with but a single thought as University of  Washington researcher controls colleague’s hand movements   LAST UPDATED AT 13:48 ON Wed 28 Aug  2013 SCIENTISTS have achieved human mind control for the first time in an  experiment at the University of Washington. Using recorded brain signals and the  magnetic stimulation of muscles, researchers were able to remotely control the  hand movements of a person in another room. The technique called “non-invasive brain-to-brain interfacing” uses the  internet to connect two brains directly, a scenario reminiscent of the  brainwashing scene in John Frankenheimer’s Cold War thriller The Manchurian Candidate. Brain-to-brain

Nitric oxide protects against parasite invasion and brain inflammation by keeping the blood brain barrier intact

Relevance: 82%      Posted on: February 25, 2016

Public Release: 25-Feb-2016   PLOS   IMAGE: Enhanced invasion of Trypanosoma brucei (red) into the brain of iNOS deficient (lower micrograph) is compared to normal (upper micrrograph) mice. In green: cerebral blood vessels. Credit: Olivera et al. African trypanosomiasis is called 'sleeping sickness' because when the infection is untreated, trypanosome parasites will invade the brain and cause disruption of sleeping patterns and irreversible neurological damage. A study published on February 25th in PLOS Pathogens reports that in a mouse model of trypanosome disease, nitric oxide (NO) plays an unexpected role in preserving the integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB),…

Perinatal antidepressant stunts brain development in rats / Miswired brain circuitry traced to early exposure

Relevance: 82%      Posted on: May 4, 2014

Public release date: 24-Oct-2011 Rats exposed to an antidepressant just before and after birth showed substantial brain abnormalities and behaviors, in a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. After receiving citalopram, a serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), during this critical period, long-distance connections between the two hemispheres of the brain showed stunted growth and degeneration. The animals also became excessively fearful when faced with new situations and failed to play normally with peers – behaviors reminiscent of novelty avoidance and social impairments seen in autism. The abnormalities were more pronounced in male than female rats, just as autism affects…

Exercise can enhance the development of new brain cells in the adult brain

Relevance: 80%      Posted on: November 27, 2015

Public Release: 25-Nov-2015 Can physical exercise enhance long-term memory? New study in mice in the inaugural issue of Brain Plasticity reports that new brain cell formation is enhanced by running IOS Press Amsterdam, NL, November 25, 2015 - Exercise can enhance the development of new brain cells in the adult brain, a process called adult neurogenesis. These newborn brain cells play an important role in learning and memory. A new study has determined that mice that spent time running on wheels not only developed twice the normal number of new neurons, but also showed an increased ability to distinguish new…

Why your brain tires when exercising : Excess Serotonin shuts down the brain causing fatigue

Relevance: 79%      Posted on: March 6, 2013

  A marathon runner approaches the finishing line, but suddenly the sweaty athlete collapses to the ground. Everyone probably assumes that this is because he has expended all energy in his muscles. What few people know is that it might also be a braking mechanism in the brain which swings into effect and makes us too tired to continue. What may be occurring is what is referred to as 'central fatigue'. "Our discovery is helping to shed light on the paradox which has long been the subject of discussion by researchers. We have always known that the neurotransmitter serotonin is…

Antidepressants linked to risk of brain bleeds: antidepressant users were about 40 to 50 percent more likely to suffer bleeding in or around the brain

Relevance: 79%      Posted on: October 17, 2012

Thu, 18 Oct 2012 00:18 GMT Reuters Oct 18 (Reuters) - People using a common class of antidepressants may have slightly increased odds of suffering bleeding in the brain - though the risk is still very small, according to a Canadian study looking at more than 500,000 people. The antidepressants are known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and include widely used drugs like fluoxetine (Prozac), sertraline (Zoloft), citalopram (Celexa) and paroxetine (Paxil.) The SSRIs have been linked to a risk of stomach bleeding, but studies have come to conflicting findings on whether SSRI users have any higher risk of…

Why your brain tires when exercising : Excess serotonin triggers a braking mechanism in the brain

Relevance: 79%      Posted on: March 6, 2013

Contact: Jean-François Perrier Perrier@sund.ku.dk 45-23-81-27-46 University of Copenhagen A marathon runner approaches the finishing line, but suddenly the sweaty athlete collapses to the ground. Everyone probably assumes that this is because he has expended all energy in his muscles. What few people know is that it might also be a braking mechanism in the brain which swings into effect and makes us too tired to continue. What may be occurring is what is referred to as 'central fatigue'. "Our discovery is helping to shed light on the paradox which has long been the subject of discussion by researchers. We have…

Vitamin C deficiency impairs early brain development: The brain retains vitamin C

Relevance: 78%      Posted on: October 29, 2012

Contact: Professor Jens Lykkesfeldt jopl@life.ku.dk 453-533-3163 University of Copenhagen New research at LIFE -- Faculty of Life Sciences at University of Copenhagen shows that vitamin C deficiency may impair the mental development of newborn babies New research at LIFE – Faculty of Life Sciences at University of Copenhagen shows that vitamin C deficiency may impair the mental development of new-born babies. In the latest issue of the well-known scientific journal the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, a group of researchers headed by professor Jens Lykkesfeldt shows that guinea pigs subjected to moderate vitamin C deficiency have 30 per cent less…

Brain parasite directly alters brain chemistry

Relevance: 78%      Posted on: August 2, 2012

  A research group from the University of Leeds has shown that infection by the brain parasite Toxoplasma gondii, found in 10-20 per cent of the UK's population, directly affects the production of dopamine, a key chemical messenger in the brain. Their findings are the first to demonstrate that a parasite found in the brain of mammals can affect dopamine levels. Whilst the work has been carried out with rodents, lead investigator Dr Glenn McConkey of the University's Faculty of Biological Sciences, believes that the findings could ultimately shed new light on treating human neurological disorders that are dopamine-related such…

Researchers detail chemotherapy’s damage to the brain” Chemotherapy drugs used to treat a wide range of cancers were more toxic to healthy brain cells than the cancer cells they were intended to treat

Relevance: 77%      Posted on: September 8, 2012

Re-post from 2008: This is not the watered down Chemo brain article released 5 Sep 2012..4 years later contact: Mark Michaud mark_michaud@urmc.rochester.edu 585-273-4790 University of Rochester Medical Center A commonly used chemotherapy drug causes healthy brain cells to die off long after treatment has ended and may be one of the underlying biological causes of the cognitive side effects – or “chemo brain” – that many cancer patients experience. That is the conclusion of a study published today in the Journal of Biology. A team of researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) and Harvard Medical School have…

Habitual tea drinking modulates brain efficiency: Evidence from brain connectivity evaluation

Relevance: 75%      Posted on: October 14, 2019

The researchers recruited healthy older participants to two groups according to their history of tea drinking frequency and investigated both functional and structural networks to reveal the role of tea drinking on brain organization. Source: Habitual tea drinking modulates brain efficiency: Evidence from brain connectivity evaluation

Diet counts: Iron intake in teen years can impact brain in later life

Relevance: 61%      Posted on: May 27, 2014

Iron is a popular topic in health news. Doctors prescribe it for medical reasons, and it's available over the counter as a dietary supplement. And while it's known that too little iron can result in cognitive problems, it's also known that too much promotes neurodegenerative diseases. Now, researchers at UCLA have found that in addition to causing cognitive problems, a lack of iron early in life can affect the brain's physical structure as well. UCLA neurology professor Paul Thompson and his colleagues measured levels of transferrin, a protein that transports iron throughout the body and brain, in adolescents and discovered…

Could we copy a specific brain or transfer our minds to another device? Research suggests this amazing idea might be feasible

Relevance: 60%      Posted on: November 2, 2012

Mind transfer: human brains in different materials 02 November 2012 by Randal A. Koene Magazine issue 2888.  Subscribe and save For similar stories, visit the The Big Idea , The Human Brain and Death Topic Guides HUMAN brains and the minds that emerge from them have allowed us to create culture and civilisation. But ensuring the survival of those marvels (not to mention of our species) in the face of technological and environmental onslaughts will depend on how well those minds adapt. We have always augmented ourselves in the face of challenges, creating artefacts from clothing to cellphones to cochlear…

Compelling evidence that brain parts evolve independently

Relevance: 58%      Posted on: September 25, 2012

Contact: Morwenna Grills Morwenna.Grills@manchester.ac.uk 44-161-275-2111 University of Manchester An Evolutionary Biologist at The University of Manchester, working with scientists in the United States, has found compelling evidence that parts of the brain can evolve independently from each other. It's hoped the findings will significantly advance our understanding of the brain. The unique 15 year study with researchers at the University of Tennessee and Harvard Medical School also identified several genetic loci that control the size of different brain parts. The aim of the research was to find out if different parts of the brain can respond independently of each other…

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