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Levels of coumarin in cassia cinnamon vary greatly even in bark from the same tree

Relevance: 100%      Posted on: February 27, 2014

Public release date: 3-Nov-2010   A “huge” variation exists in the amounts of coumarin in bark samples of cassia cinnamon from trees growing in Indonesia, scientists are reporting in a new study. That natural ingredient in the spice may carry a theoretical risk of causing liver damage in a small number of sensitive people who consume large amounts of cinnamon. The report appears in ACS’ bi-weekly Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.   Friederike Woehrlin and colleagues note that cinnamon is the second most popular spice, next to black pepper, in the United States and Europe. Cinnamon, which comes from…

Cinnamon May Be Used to Halt the Progression of Parkinson’s disease

Relevance: 83%      Posted on: July 12, 2014

" The study found that after oral feeding, ground cinnamon is metabolized into sodium benzoate, which then enters into the brain, stops the loss of Parkin and DJ-1, protects neurons, normalizes neurotransmitter levels, and improves motor functions in mice with PD." July 08, 2014 Study Results Published in the Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology (CHICAGO) – Neurological scientists at Rush University Medical Center have found that using cinnamon, a common food spice and flavoring material, can reverse the biomechanical, cellular and anatomical changes that occur in the brains of mice with Parkinson’s disease (PD). The results of the study were recently published…

Alzheimer’s Prevention in Your Pantry / cinnamon extract to inhibit progression of Alzheimer’s disease

Relevance: 71%      Posted on: April 9, 2014

Public release date: 27-Jun-2011   TAU researcher discovers a cinnamon extract to inhibit progression of Alzheimer’s disease Alzheimer’s, the degenerative brain disorder that disrupts memory, thought and behavior, is devastating to both patients and loved ones. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, one in eight Americans over the age of 65 suffers from the disease. Now Tel Aviv University has discovered that an everyday spice in your kitchen cupboard could hold the key to Alzheimer’s prevention. An extract found in cinnamon bark, called CEppt, contains properties that can inhibit the development of the disease, according to Prof. Michael Ovadia of the…

Traditional Danish pasties threatened by EU cinnamon ban

Relevance: 66%      Posted on: December 26, 2013

Proposals for an EU ban on cinnamon rolls have put a dampener on Denmark's Christmas festivities "It's the end of the cinnamon roll as we know it," said Hardy Christensen, the head of the Danish Baker's Association Photo: ANDREW CROWLEY By Bruno Waterfield, Brussels 2:27PM GMT 26 Dec 2013 The season's festivities in Denmark have been overshadowed by the prospect that it could be the last Danish Christmas before a European Union ban on their beloved kanelsnegler or cinnamon rolls. The proposed ban followed plans by Denmark's food safety agency to implement EU regulations aimed at limiting the amount of coumarin,…

Researchers find the cinnamon turns poor learners into good ones

Relevance: 66%      Posted on: July 23, 2016

Public Release: 21-Jul-2016 Cinnamon may be fragrant medicine for the brain Veterans Affairs Research Communications If Dr. Kalipada Pahan's research pans out, the standard advice for failing students might one day be: Study harder and eat your cinnamon! Pahan a researcher at Rush University and the Jesse Brown Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Chicago, has found that cinnamon turns poor learners into good ones--among mice, that is. He hopes the same will hold true for people. His group published their latest findings online June 24, 2016, in the Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology. "The increase in learning in poor-learning mice after…

Preventing foodborne illness, naturally — with cinnamon

Relevance: 52%      Posted on: July 18, 2014

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE: 16-Jul-2014 Essential oil kills several strains of E. coli PULLMAN, Wash. – Seeking ways to prevent some of the most serious foodborne illnesses caused by pathogenic bacteria, two Washington State University scientists have found promise in an ancient but common cooking spice: cinnamon. Recent findings published in Food Control journal online suggest Cinnamomum cassia oil can work effectively as a natural antibacterial agent in the food industry. The study results add to a body of knowledge that will help improve food safety and reduce or eliminate cases of food poisoning and related deaths. In the study, the…

Cinnamon is lethal weapon against E. coli O157:H7

Relevance: 48%      Posted on: September 2, 2012

Contact: Angela Dansby aldansby@ift.org 312-782-8424 x127 Institute of Food Technologists When cinnamon is in, Escherichia coli O157:H7 is out.  That's what researchers at Kansas State University discovered in laboratory tests with cinnamon and apple juice heavily tainted with the bacteria.  Presented at the Institute of Food Technologists' 1999 Annual Meeting in Chicago on July 27, the study findings revealed that cinnamon is a lethal weapon against  E. coli O157:H7 and may be able to help control it in unpasteurized juices. Lead researcher Erdogan Ceylan, M.S., reported that in apple juice samples inoculated with about one million E. coli O157:H7 bacteria,…

Researchers study cinnamon extracts

Relevance: 48%      Posted on: February 17, 2014

Public release date: 24-Aug-2010  - improvement in antioxidant status was correlated with decreases in fasting glucose A study led by U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) chemist Richard Anderson suggests that a water soluble extract of cinnamon, which contains antioxidative compounds, could help reduce risk factors associated with diabetes and heart disease. The work is part of cooperative agreements between the Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center (BHNRC) operated by USDA’s Agricultural Research Service (ARS) at Beltsville, Md.; Integrity Nutraceuticals International of Spring Hill, Tenn., and the Joseph Fourier University in Grenoble, France. Anderson works in the Diet, Genomics and Immunology Laboratory…

UA researchers discover component of cinnamon prevents colorectal cancer in mice

Relevance: 48%      Posted on: June 15, 2015

Public Release: 15-Jun-2015 University of Arizona College of Pharmacy study shows compound that gives cinnamon its distinctive flavor and smell is a potent inhibitor University of Arizona, College of Pharmacy Research conducted at the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy and the UA Cancer Center indicates that a compound derived from cinnamon is a potent inhibitor of colorectal cancer. Georg Wondrak, Ph.D., associate professor, and Donna Zhang, Ph.D., professor, both of the UA College of Pharmacy Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, recently completed a study in which they proved that adding cinnamaldehyde, the compound that gives cinnamon its distinctive flavor…

The spice of life: Cinnamon cools your stomach

Relevance: 45%      Posted on: October 4, 2016

Public Release: 3-Oct-2016 RMIT University Adding cinnamon to your diet can cool your body by up to two degrees, according to new research. And the spice may also contribute to a general improvement in overall health. The research has been published in the journal, Scientific Reports. Project leader Distinguished Professor Kourosh Kalantar-zadeh, from RMIT University's School of Engineering in Melbourne, Australia, said the results of the study, which used pigs, seemed to show that cinnamon maintained the integrity of the stomach wall. "When pigs feed at room temperature, carbon dioxide (CO2) gas increases in their stomach. "Cinnamon in their food…

Cinnamon may lessen damage of high-fat diet in rats

Relevance: 43%      Posted on: May 8, 2017

Public Release: 6-May-2017   Saturday news tip -- American Heart Association Meeting Report poster session 3 -- poster presentation 545 American Heart Association   Minneapolis, May 6, 2016 -- Cinnamon may lessen the risk of cardiovascular damage of a high-fat diet by activating the body's antioxidant and anti-inflammatory systems and slowing the fat-storing process, according to a preliminary animal study presented at the American Heart Association's Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology | Peripheral Vascular Disease 2017 Scientific Sessions. In the study, researchers fed rats cinnamon supplements for 12 weeks along with a high-fat diet. They found: The rats weighed less…

093 Health Research Report 14 NOV 2010

Relevance: 40%      Posted on: November 14, 2010

Health Research Report 93rd Issue 14 NOV 2010 Compiled By Ralph Turchiano www.vit.bz www.youtube.com/vhfilm  www.facebook.com/engineeringevil www.engineeringevil.com   www.healthresearchreport.me  Editors Top Five:   Black raspberries may prevent colon cancer Study finds Plantar Fasciitis? Stretching seems to do the trick Obesity rate will reach at least 42 percent, say models of social contagion Dangerous chemicals in food wrappers likely migrating to humans U of T study Myth of a germ-free world: A closer look at antimicrobial products In This Issue: 1. Pregnant women who eat peanuts may put infants at increased risk for peanut allergy 2. Antibiotics have long-term impacts on gut flora 3. Common stomach…

Cinnamon, Colorectal Cancers Foe

Relevance: 39%      Posted on: June 18, 2015

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y8zqyIaXUMU&feature=youtu.be Cinnamon, Colorectal Cancers Foe Research conducted at the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy and the UA Cancer Center indicates that a compound derived from cinnamon is a potent inhibitor of colorectal cancer. UA College of Pharmacy Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, recently completed a study in which they proved that adding cinnamaldehyde, the compound that gives cinnamon its distinctive flavor and smell, to the diet of mice protected the mice against colorectal cancer. In response to cinnamaldehyde, the animals' cells had acquired the ability to protect themselves against exposure to a carcinogen through detoxification and repair. Please like…

Cinnamon turns up the heat on fat cells

Relevance: 39%      Posted on: November 21, 2017

Public Release: 21-Nov-2017   University of Michigan ANN ARBOR--New research from the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute has determined how a common holiday spice--cinnamon--might be enlisted in the fight against obesity. Scientists had previously observed that cinnamaldehyde, an essential oil that gives cinnamon its flavor, appeared to protect mice against obesity and hyperglycemia. But the mechanisms underlying the effect were not well understood. Researchers in the lab of Jun Wu, research assistant professor at the LSI, wanted to better understand cinnamaldehyde's action and determine whether it might be protective in humans, too. "Scientists were finding that this compound affected…

233 CNO Report 26 JUL 2016

Relevance: 38%      Posted on: July 26, 2016

233cno23jul2016 Release Date 26 JUL 2016 Draft Report Compiled by Ralph Turchiano www.clinicalnews.org   - In this Issue: 1. Boosting the potency of a broccoli-related compound yields a possible treatment for mac D 2. Hops extract studied to prevent breast cancer 3. Study: Gut bacteria can cause, predict and prevent rheumatoid arthritis 4. Study shows a new role for B-complex vitamins in promoting stem cell proliferation 5. Thumb-sucking and nail-biting have a positive side 6. Milestone study on pomegranate anti-aging mechanism reported by Amazentis SA and EPFL 7. Viruses revealed to be a major driver of human evolution 8. How…

Cinnamon may be used to halt the progression of Parkinson’s disease

Relevance: 35%      Posted on: July 12, 2014

Cinnamon may be used to halt the progression of Parkinson's disease - The study found that after oral feeding, ground cinnamon is metabolized into sodium benzoate, which then enters into the brain, stops the loss of Parkin and DJ-1, protects neurons, normalizes neurotransmitter levels, and improves motor functions in mice with PD. * June 20 2014 issue of the Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology. - http://healthresearchreport.me/2014/07/12/cinnamon-may-be-used-to-halt-the-progression-of-parkinsons-disease/

Cinnamon may aid learning ability

Relevance: 35%      Posted on: July 27, 2016

Cinnamon may aid learning ability We review the study " Cinnamon Converts Poor Learning Mice to Good Learners: Implications for Memory Improvement. " in regard to how it dramatically increased learning ability. * Citation Title " Cinnamon Converts Poor Learning Mice to Good Learners: Implications for Memory Improvement." DOI: 10.1007/s11481-016-9693-6

Cinnamon turns up the heat on fat cells

Relevance: 35%      Posted on: November 22, 2017

Cinnamon turns up the heat on fat cells Cinnamon turns up the heat on fat cells Researchers were looking for ways to prompt fat cells to activate thermogenesis, turning the fat-burning processes back on. They discovered that Cinnamon may be an easy and readily available way to do just that. Cinnamaldehyde induces fat cell-autonomous thermogenesis and metabolic reprogramming. Metabolism, 2017; 77: 58 DOI: 10.1016/j.metabol.2017.08.006

Peppermint oil and cinnamon could help treat and heal chronic wounds

Relevance: 33%      Posted on: July 9, 2015

Public Release: 8-Jul-2015 American Chemical Society   Infectious colonies of bacteria called biofilms that develop on chronic wounds and medical devices can cause serious health problems and are tough to treat. But now scientists have found a way to package antimicrobial compounds from peppermint and cinnamon in tiny capsules that can both kill biofilms and actively promote healing. The researchers say the new material, reported in the journal ACS Nano, could be used as a topical antibacterial treatment and disinfectant. Many bacteria clump together in sticky plaques in a way that makes them difficult to eliminate with traditional antibiotics. Doctors…

209 CNO Report 26 JUN 2015

Relevance: 23%      Posted on: June 27, 2015

209CNO29JUN2015 CNO Report 209 Release Date 26 JUN 2015 Draft Report Compiled by Ralph Turchiano www.clinicalnews.org     In This Issue: 1.       Vitamin D status related to immune response to HIV-1 2.       Researchers correlate rheumatoid arthritis and giant cell arteritis with solar cycles 3.       Avocados may hold the answer to beating leukemia 4.       UA researchers discover component of cinnamon prevents colorectal cancer in mice 5.       New study finds that orange sweet potato reduces diarrhea in children 6.       Not-so-guilty pleasure: Viewing cat videos boosts energy and positive emotions 7.       Extreme exercise linked to blood poisoning 8.       Fructose powers a vicious circle…

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