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Planck shows almost perfect cosmos – plus axis of evil/ suggests that new universes are continually popping into existence and expanding

Relevance: 100%      Posted on: March 24, 2013

  13:42 21 March 2013 by Jacob Aron For similar stories, visit the Cosmology Topic Guide Interactive graphic: See how Planck brings the cosmic ripples into focus The universe is almost perfect, 80 million years older than we thought, and maybe a little bit evil. That's the conclusion of a four-year mission conducted by the European Space Agency's Planck spacecraft, which has created the highest-resolution map yet of the entire cosmic microwave background (CMB) – the first light to travel across a newly transparent universe about 380,000 years after the big bang. "It might look like a dirty rugby ball…

Russian representative denies US media claims of his involvement in espionage – Rossotrudnichestvo exchange program

Relevance: 80%      Posted on: October 23, 2013

Photo EPA/CJ GUNTHER WASHINGTON, October 24 (Itar-Tass) - Representative of   Russia’s Federal Agency for Cooperation with   Fellow-Countrymen Abroad /Rossotrudnichestvo/ in   Washington, Yury Zaytsev, has expressed astonishment over   publications in the U.S. media saying that the FBI suspects   him of working for the Russian intelligence services. Reports on Zaytsev’s alleged illegal activities were   put up by several US media at a time, including the   Internet version of The Washington Post, which mentioned   unnamed law enforcement officials as the sources of   information. According to the newspaper, FBI agents have been   interviewing Americans who participated in the   Rossotrudnichestvo exchange program run by Zaytsev,…

“If the U.S. government is really interested in finding the real organisers of the explosions in Boston … then they should focus on the involvement of the Russian special services in the events,”Caucasian mujahideen

Relevance: 78%      Posted on: April 21, 2013

Russia's Islamist rebels say not at war with Washington Sun, 21 Apr 2013 17:11 GMT Reuters * Says North Caucasus militants are at war with Moscow * Leader previously told militants not to attack civilians  (Adds quotes) By Thomas Grove MOSCOW, April 21 (Reuters) - A group leading an Islamist insurgency against Russia said on Sunday it was not at war with the United States, distancing itself from last week's Boston Marathon bombing. Ethnic Chechen Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, who was killed in a gunfight with police following a manhunt that shut down Boston on Friday, and his younger brother Djokhar,…

IBS and bloating: When the gut microbiota gets out of balance

Relevance: 32%      Posted on: March 14, 2014

- bread, cereals and pastries made of whole wheat, and beans, soy beans, corn, peas, Brussels' sprouts, cauliflower, broccoli, cabbage, celery, onions, leek, garlic, artichokes, figs, peaches, grapes and prunes) induces profound changes in the microbiota of IBS patients, thus prolonging and increasing the symptoms (March 10, 2014) Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) belongs to the most widespread diseases in Western countries, causing up to sixty per cent of the workload of gastrointestinal physicians. One of the most frequent symptoms of IBS is bloating, which reduces quality of life considerably as patients perceive it as particularly bothersome. For quite a long…

A tricky balancing act: Antibiotics versus the gut microbiota

Relevance: 31%      Posted on: March 14, 2014

- infants and children averaging one course of antibiotics every year - Low doses of antibiotics have been used for decades in the agricultural industry to promote weight gain in farm animals - "Infancy is an important time in the development of the human microbiota and these studies provide evidence that early exposure to antibiotics may disrupt the early-life microbiota and lead to changes in growth and metabolic development," (March 10, 2014) Antibiotics are valuable, potentially life-saving tools that have significantly reduced human morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, antibiotics may also have unintended consequences from their off-target effects that may increase…

Gut bacteria population, diversity linked to anorexia nervosa

Relevance: 30%      Posted on: October 5, 2015

Public Release: 5-Oct-2015   Studying the 'gut-brain axis,' UNC researchers find evidence of an association between the gut microbiota and the eating disorder University of North Carolina Health Care October 5, 2015 CHAPEL HILL, NC - Researchers at the UNC School of Medicine found that people with anorexia nervosa have very different microbial communities residing inside their guts compared to healthy individuals and that this bacterial imbalance is associated with some of the psychological symptoms related to the eating disorder. The findings, published today in the journal Psychosomatic Medicine, provide more evidence that the abundance and diversity of the gut…

Newborn gut microbiome predicts later allergy and asthma, study finds

Relevance: 25%      Posted on: September 13, 2016

  Microbial byproducts link particular early-life gut microbes to immune dysfunction Date: September 12, 2016 Source: University of California - San Francisco Summary: The microbes living in a baby's gut during its first month of life may directly impact the developing immune system, leading to a higher risk of allergies and asthma later in childhood, according to a new study. The findings highlight the importance of developing early interventions to improve microbial health in young infants. Asthmatic man suffers from asthma and is using inhaler. Breastfeeding, vaginal births (as opposed to C-sections) and even having dogs in the household during…

Can chemicals produced by gut microbiota affect children with autism?

Relevance: 25%      Posted on: May 23, 2014

Can chemicals produced by gut microbiota affect children with autism? // PUBLIC RELEASE DATE: 19-May-2014 Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have significantly different concentrations of certain bacterial-produced chemicals, called metabolites, in their feces compared to children without ASD. This research, presented at the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, provides further evidence that bacteria in the gut may be linked to autism. "Most gut bacteria are beneficial, aiding food digestion, producing vitamins, and protecting against harmful bacteria. If left unchecked, however, harmful bacteria can excrete dangerous metabolites or disturb a balance in metabolites that can affect the…

Study suggests gut bacteria can aid recovery from spinal cord injury

Relevance: 24%      Posted on: October 18, 2016

Public Release: 17-Oct-2016   Rockefeller University Press   IMAGE: Disrupting the gut microbiome with antibiotics before spinal cord injury (bottom) increases the number of inflammatory cells (brown) in the damaged region of the spine. Credit: Kigerl et al., 2016 Researchers from The Ohio State University have discovered that spinal cord injury alters the type of bacteria living in the gut and that these changes can exacerbate the extent of neurological damage and impair recovery of function. The study, "Gut dysbiosis impairs recovery after spinal cord injury," by Kristina A. Kigerl et al., which will be published online October 17 ahead…

What is the role of the gut microbiome in developing Parkinson’s disease?

Relevance: 24%      Posted on: June 23, 2015

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015 A survey of the current literature suggests complex interactions, as reported in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease IOS Press   Caption Flow chart illustrating reported effects between urate, smoking, coffee, and different physiological domains with possible relevance for PD risk. Furthermore, it is shown which of these factors are also related to changes in gut microbiota providing ground for interactions. However, at present direct evidence for such interactions is missing and information is derived from in vitro as well as in vivo studies on humans and animal models. Credit: Journal of Parkinson's Disease Amsterdam, NL, June 23,…

That anxiety may be in your gut, not in your head ? Antibiotics may lead to anxiety

Relevance: 24%      Posted on: April 2, 2014

  - disrupting the normal bacterial content of the gut with antibiotics produced changes in behaviour; the mice became less cautious or anxious     Public release date: 17-May-2011   McMaster research finds link between gut bacteria and behavior   Hamilton, ON (May 17, 2011) – For the first time, researchers at McMaster University have conclusive evidence that bacteria residing in the gut influence brain chemistry and behaviour.   The findings are important because several common types of gastrointestinal disease, including irritable bowel syndrome, are frequently associated with anxiety or depression. In addition there has been speculation that some psychiatric…

Breastfeeding promotes the growth of beneficial bacteria in the gut

Relevance: 24%      Posted on: May 9, 2014

Wednesday 07 May 14   The nutritional factor that has the greatest impact on the development of a child's gut flora is whether the child is breastfed, according to a new study by the National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, and the University of Copenhagen. The study shows that breastfeeding promotes the growth of beneficial lactic acid bacteria in the baby's gut flora, which are beneficial to the development of the child's immune system.     A number of studies have shown that breastfed babies grow slightly slower and are slightly slimmer than children who are fed with infant…

Variety in Diet Can Hamper Microbial Diversity in the Gut

Relevance: 24%      Posted on: May 30, 2014

Wednesday, May 28, 2014 Scientists from The University of Texas at Austin and five other institutions have discovered that the more diverse the diet of a fish, the less diverse are the microbes living in its gut. If the effect is confirmed in humans, it could mean that the combinations of foods people eat can influence the diversity of their gut microbes. The research could have implications for how probiotics and diet are used to treat diseases associated with the bacteria in human digestive systems. Fish that are picky eaters, focusing on just one type of food, such as small…

Doctors’ ‘gut feeling’ should not be ignored

Relevance: 24%      Posted on: October 14, 2014

05 OCT 2012 Research: Clinicians’ gut feeling about serious infections in children: Observational study Doctors who experience a gut feeling about serious illness when treating a child in primary care should take action upon this feeling and not ignore it, a study published today on bmj.com suggests. Serious infection can easily be missed in young children and making a diagnosis has been described as “like finding a needle in a haystack”. A clinician’s intuitive feeling that something is wrong, even after examination that suggests otherwise, appears to have diagnostic value, even greater diagnostic value than most symptoms and signs. Studies…

Gut bacteria that protect against food allergies identified

Relevance: 23%      Posted on: August 28, 2014

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014 Common gut bacteria prevent sensitization to allergens in a mouse model for peanut allergy, paving the way for probiotic therapies to treat food allergies The presence of Clostridia, a common class of gut bacteria, protects against food allergies, a new study in mice finds. By inducing immune responses that prevent food allergens from entering the bloodstream, Clostridia minimize allergen exposure and prevent sensitization – a key step in the development of food allergies. The discovery points toward probiotic therapies for this so-far untreatable condition, report scientists from the University of Chicago, Aug 25 in the Proceedings of

Critically ill ICU patients lose almost all of their gut microbes and the ones left aren’t good

Relevance: 23%      Posted on: September 25, 2014

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014 Researchers at the University of Chicago have shown that after a long stay in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) only a handful of pathogenic microbe species remain behind in patients' intestines. The team tested these remaining pathogens and discovered that some can become deadly when provoked by conditions that mimic the body's stress response to illness. The findings, published in mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, may lead to better monitoring and treatment of ICU patients who can develop a life-threatening systemic infection known as sepsis. "I have watched patients die from…

Critically ill ICU patients lose almost all of their gut microbes and the ones left aren’t good

Relevance: 23%      Posted on: September 27, 2014

Critically ill ICU patients lose almost all of their gut microbes and the ones left aren’t good - They found that patients with stays longer than a month had only one to four types of microbes in their gut, as measured from fecal samples—compared to about 40 different types found in healthy volunteers. * published in mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology SEP 2014 - http://healthresearchreport.me/2014/09/25/critically-ill-icu-patients-lose-almost-all-of-their-gut-microbes-and-the-ones-left-arent-good/ Related articles Pathogens Remaining in ICU Patients Can be Deadly Long ICU Stays May Alter Gut Microbes Critically ill ICU patients lose almost all of their gut microbesand the…

Study suggests altering gut bacteria might mitigate lupus

Relevance: 23%      Posted on: October 23, 2014

" Luo suggests that people with lupus should eat Lactobacillus-containing probiotics, such as live culture yogurts, to reduce lupus flares " WASHINGTON, DC – October 20, 2014 -- Lactobacillus species, commonly seen in yogurt cultures, correlate, in the guts of mouse models, with mitigation of lupus symptoms, while Lachnospiraceae, a type of Clostridia, correlate with worsening, according to research published ahead of print in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. "Our results suggest that the same investigation shold be performed in human subjects with lupus," says principal investigator Xin Luo of Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA. In the study, the investigators first showed…

Clues about autism may come from the gut

Relevance: 23%      Posted on: July 5, 2013

Contact: Joseph Caspermeyer Joseph.Caspermeyer@asu.edu Arizona State University Bacterial flora inhabiting the human gut have become one of the hottest topics in biological research. Implicated in a range of important activities including digestion, fine-tuning body weight, regulating immune response, and producing neurotransmitters affect that brain and behavior, these tiny workers form diverse communities. Hundreds of species inhabit the gut, and although most are beneficial, some can be very dangerous. In new research appearing in the journal PLOS ONE, a team led by Rosa Krajmalnik-Brown, a researcher at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute, present the first comprehensive bacterial analysis focusing on commensal…

Clues about autism may come from the gut

Relevance: 23%      Posted on: July 5, 2013

Contact: Joseph Caspermeyer Joseph.Caspermeyer@asu.edu Arizona State University Bacterial flora inhabiting the human gut have become one of the hottest topics in biological research. Implicated in a range of important activities including digestion, fine-tuning body weight, regulating immune response, and producing neurotransmitters affect that brain and behavior, these tiny workers form diverse communities. Hundreds of species inhabit the gut, and although most are beneficial, some can be very dangerous. In new research appearing in the journal PLOS ONE, a team led by Rosa Krajmalnik-Brown, a researcher at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute, present the first comprehensive bacterial analysis focusing on commensal…

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