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Vitamin E helps diminish fatty liver disease in children and adults, reduced death of liver cells

Relevance: 100%      Posted on: March 27, 2014

Public release date: 27-Apr-2011 - Using liver biopsies, researchers found that after 96 weeks of treatment, 58 percent of the children on vitamin E no longer had NASH, compared to 41 percent of the children on metformin (a diabetes drug), and 28 percent on placebo. Vitamin E was better than placebo because it significantly reduced enlargement and death of liver cells. NIH-funded researchers gain ground in treatment A specific form of vitamin E improved the most severe form of fatty liver disease in some children, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. Results appear in the…

Dietary fructose intake does suggest that higher fructose consumption (as would occur with the consumption of processed food and sweetened beverages) could deplete the liver of energy and thus risk causing worse metabolic problems and potentially even liver injury

Relevance: 94%      Posted on: July 14, 2014

04 May 2012 Increased fructose consumption may deplete cellular energy in patients with obesity and diabetes DURHAM, N.C. — Obese people who consume increased amounts of fructose, a type of sugar that is found in particular in soft drinks and fruit juices, are at risk for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NFALD) and more its more severe forms, fatty inflammation and scarring. Now researchers at Duke University Medical Center believe they better understand what mechanism may account for fructose-related liver injury. Chronic fructose consumption in a diet puts people at risk for depleting their store of critically important molecules called ATP,…

How did glycine significantly decrease liver injury?:Protected both the lung and liver against lethal doses of endotoxins

Relevance: 84%      Posted on: September 29, 2012

2008 study posted for filing Contact: Lin-Lin Xiao wjg@wjgnet.com 86-105-908-0039 World Journal of Gastroenterology The nonessential amino acid glycine has been shown to be anti-inflammatory in several animal injury models. Recent studies demonstrated that dietary glycine protected both the lung and liver against lethal doses of endotoxin in rat or other animals and improved graft survival after liver transplantation. The influence of dietary glycine on oxidant-induced or cholestatic liver injury was not known. A research article to be published on October 21, 2008 in the World Journal of Gastroenterology addresses this question. The research team led by Prof. Thurman from…

Drinking decaf coffee may be good for the liver

Relevance: 74%      Posted on: October 10, 2014

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE: 9-Oct-2014 Researchers from the National Cancer Institute report that decaffeinated coffee drinking may benefit liver health. Results of the study published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, show that higher coffee consumption, regardless of caffeine content, was linked to lower levels of abnormal liver enzymes. This suggests that chemical compounds in coffee other than caffeine may help protect the liver. Coffee consumption is highly prevalent with more than half of all Americans over 18 drinking on average three cups each day according to a 2010 report from the National…

Take a coffee or tea break to protect your liver

Relevance: 69%      Posted on: June 6, 2017

Public Release: 6-Jun-2017   New study indicates that drinking even a few cups a day may prevent hardening of the liver, reports the Journal of Hepatology Elsevier IMAGE: Using data from the Rotterdam Study researchers determined that frequent coffee and herbal tea consumption were inversely related with liver stiffness but not steatosis in the general population. Credit: L. Alferink and S. Darwish Murad Amsterdam, The Netherlands, June 6, 2017 - Chronic liver diseases rank as the 12th cause of death worldwide and many of these disorders are associated with unhealthy lifestyles. Conversely, a healthier lifestyle can help prevent or reverse…

Common acid reflux medications promote chronic liver disease

Relevance: 69%      Posted on: October 10, 2017

Public Release: 10-Oct-2017   University of California - San Diego Caption In mice, some common acid reflux medications promote growth of Enterococcus bacteria (like those shown here artificially glowing red in a petri dish) in the intestines. These bacteria also translocate to the liver, where they exacerbate inflammation and worsen chronic liver disease. Credit: UC San Diego Health Approximately 10 percent of the general population take a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) drug to block stomach acid secretions and relieve symptoms of frequent heartburn, acid reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease. That percentage can be as much as seven times higher for…

Study shows broccoli may offer protection against liver cancer

Relevance: 66%      Posted on: March 4, 2016

Public Release: 3-Mar-2016   University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences URBANA, Ill. - Consumption of broccoli has increased in the United States over the last few decades as scientists have reported that eating the vegetable three to five times per week can lower the risk of many types of cancer including breast, prostate, and colon cancers. A new study from the University of Illinois reports that including broccoli in the diet may also protect against liver cancer, as well as aid in countering the development of fatty liver or nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) which can…

Vitamin E lowers liver cancer risk

Relevance: 64%      Posted on: September 1, 2014

“We found a clear, inverse dose-response relation between vitamin E intake and liver cancer risk,” High consumption of vitamin E either from diet or vitamin supplements may lower the risk of liver cancer, according to a study published July 17 2012 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Liver cancer is the third most common cause of cancer mortality in the world, the fifth most common cancer found in men and the seventh most common in women. Approximately 85% of liver cancers occur in developing nations, with 54% in China alone. Some epidemiological studies have been done to examine…

Increase in coffee consumption could provide protective effect in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Relevance: 64%      Posted on: April 15, 2016

Public Release: 13-Apr-2016   A daily dose of coffee could improve several key markers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease by reducing permeability of the gut European Association for the Study of the Liver April 13, 2016, Barcelona, Spain: Adding coffee to the diet of people with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) could help reverse the condition, according to a new study conducted in mice presented at The International Liver CongressTM 2016 in Barcelona, Spain. The study found that a daily dose of coffee (equivalent to six cups of espresso coffee for a 70kg person) improved several key markers of NAFLD…

Low vitamin D linked to fatty liver disease in UK children

Relevance: 63%      Posted on: April 17, 2014

London, UK, Saturday 12 April 2014: A UK study[i] investigating the link between low vitamin D status and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in British children has identified a genetic variant associated with the disease's severity. The research, conducted by the King's College Hospital Paediatric Liver Centre and the University of Surrey's School of Biosciences and Medicine, and funded by the Children's Liver Disease Foundation retrospectively analysed the medical records of 120 paediatric patients with NAFLD. The findings could carry significant implications for UK clinicians in light of the nation's rising number of childhood NAFLD cases. High levels of vitamin…

Researchers show that Liver Fibrosis can be stopped, cured and reversed

Relevance: 62%      Posted on: August 29, 2012

Contact: Debra Kain ddkain@ucsd.edu 619-543-6163 University of California - San Diego Modified protein developed by UC-San Diego researchers may lead to first cure for cirrhosis of the liver University of California, San Diego researchers have proven in animal studies that fibrosis in the liver can be not only stopped, but reversed.  Their discovery, to be published in PLoS Online on December 26, opens the door to treating and curing conditions that lead to excessive tissue scarring such as viral hepatitis, fatty liver disease, cirrhosis, pulmonary fibrosis, scleroderma and burns. Six years ago, the UC San Diego School of Medicine research…

Study shows potential benefit of dark chocolate for liver disease patients

Relevance: 62%      Posted on: November 18, 2012

2010 study posted for filing Contact: Isabelle Scali media.easl2010@cohnwolfe.com 44-771-743-5103 European Association for the Study of the Liver Vienna, Austria, Thursday 15 April: Doctors could soon be prescribing a dose of dark chocolate to help patients suffering from liver cirrhosis and from dangerously high blood pressure in their abdomen, according to new research presented today at the International Liver CongressTM 2010, the Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Liver in Vienna, Austria. According to the Spanish research, eating dark chocolate reduces damage to the blood vessels of cirrhotic patients and also lowers blood pressure in the…

Antioxidant improves donated liver survival rate to more than 90 percent

Relevance: 60%      Posted on: March 1, 2013

Contact: Dawn Peters sciencenewsroom@wiley.com 781-388-8408 Wiley Researchers from Italy have found that the antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), when injected prior to harvesting of the liver, significantly improves graft survival following transplantation. Results published in the February issue of Liver Transplantation, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD), suggest that the NAC effect on early graft function and survival is higher when suboptimal organs are used. A 2010 World Health Organization (WHO) report estimates that 22,000 liver transplants were performed worldwide, with nearly 18,500 from deceased donors. According to the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN)…

Antioxidant may prevent alcohol-induced liver disease

Relevance: 59%      Posted on: March 31, 2014

Public release date: 2-May-2011 BIRMINGHAM, Ala. – An antioxidant may prevent damage to the liver caused by excessive alcohol, according to new research from the University of Alabama at Birmingham. The findings, published online April 21, 2011, in the journal Hepatology, may point the way to treatments to reverse steatosis, or fatty deposits in the liver that can lead to cirrhosis and cancer. The research team, led by Victor Darley-Usmar, Ph.D., professor of pathology at UAB, introduced an antioxidant called mitochondria-targeted ubiquinone, or MitoQ, to the mitochondria of rats that were given alcohol every day for five to six weeks…

Soap and toothpaste ingredient may be linked to liver tumors and fibrosis

Relevance: 59%      Posted on: November 22, 2014

Soap and toothpaste ingredient may be linked to liver tumors and fibrosis Cleaning yourself to death? -Triclosan, a common antimicrobial in personal hygiene products, causes liver fibrosis and cancer in mice -Study suggests triclosan may do its damage by interfering with the constitutive androstane receptor, a protein responsible for detoxifying (clearing away) foreign chemicals in the body. To compensate for this stress, liver cells proliferate and turn fibrotic over time. Repeated triclosan exposure and continued liver fibrosis eventually promote tumor formation. *Published Nov. 17 by Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences http://healthresearchreport.me/2014/11/20/soap-and-toothpaste-ingredient-may-be-linked-to-liver-tumors-and-fibrosis/ Related articles Soap and toothpaste ingredient may…

Mouse study shows the sugar trehalose triggers liver cells to clean up their excess fat

Relevance: 59%      Posted on: February 23, 2016

Public Release: 23-Feb-2016 Natural sugar may treat fatty liver disease Mouse study shows the sugar trehalose triggers liver cells to clean up their excess fat Washington University School of Medicine Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, a condition closely linked to obesity, affects roughly 25 percent of people in the U.S. There is no drug treatment for the disease, although weight loss can reduce the buildup of fat in the liver. Now, studying mice, new research shows that a natural sugar called trehalose prevents the sugar fructose -- thought to be a major contributor to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease -- from entering…

CRI researchers link absence of protein to liver tissue regeneration

Relevance: 59%      Posted on: March 28, 2016

“mice lacking Arid1a would develop liver damage and, eventually, liver cancer. They were surprised when the opposite proved to be the case - no liver damage occurred. In fact, livers of the mice regenerated faster and appeared to function better” Public Release: 25-Mar-2016   UT Southwestern Medical Center Credit: UT Southwestern DALLAS - March 25, 2016 - Scientists at the Children's Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI) report that inactivating a certain protein-coding gene promotes liver tissue regeneration in mammals. "This research gives us ideas about new ways to treat liver damage or chronic liver disease," said senior…

Specific populations of gut bacteria linked to fatty liver ( Lack of Choline )

Relevance: 58%      Posted on: March 17, 2014

Public release date: 31-Jan-2011 Findings point to digestive bacterial influence on choline metabolismCholine deficiency also implicates genetics, since many people lack the genes to efficiently make choline internally. The more we learn about biology, the closer we get to being able to treat disease – and the more complicated our understanding of disease itself becomes. A new research finding showing a strong relationship between complex microbial ecologies in human intestines and the common but serious medical condition known as fatty liver illustrates this paradox. From past genomic studies, we have learned that a mind-boggling multitude of different kinds of benign bacteria…

Caffeine from Coffee consumption associated with less severe liver fibrosis

Relevance: 58%      Posted on: November 8, 2012

Contact: Dawn Peters medicalnews@wiley.com 781-388-8408 Wiley-Blackwell Study finds caffeine in sources other than coffee does not have similar effect Researchers from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) determined that patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) who consumed more than 308 mg of caffeine daily had milder liver fibrosis. The daily amount of caffeine intake found to be beneficial is equivalent to 2.25 cups of regular coffee. Other sources of caffeine beyond coffee did not have the same therapeutic effect. Details of this study are available in the January 2010 issue of Hepatology, a journal…

Increased dietary high fructose linked to elevated uric acid levels and lower liver energy stores

Relevance: 57%      Posted on: October 6, 2014

27 SEP 2012 Obese patients with type 2 diabetes who consume higher amounts of fructose display reduced levels of liver adenosine triphosphate (ATP)—a compound involved in the energy transfer between cells. The findings, published in the September issue of Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, indicate that elevated uric acid levels (hyperuricemia) are associated with more severe hepatic ATP depletion in response to fructose intake. This exploratory study, funded in part by grants from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), also suggests that uric acid levels may serve…

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