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Surprising new role for lungs: Making blood

Relevance: 100%      Posted on: March 24, 2017

Public Release: 22-Mar-2017   Cells in mouse lungs produce most blood platelets and can replenish blood-making cells in bone marrow, study shows University of California - San Francisco Using video microscopy in the living mouse lung, UC San Francisco scientists have revealed that the lungs play a previously unrecognized role in blood production. As reported online March 22, 2017 in Nature, the researchers found that the lungs produced more than half of the platelets -- blood components required for the clotting that stanches bleeding -- in the mouse circulation. In another surprise finding, the scientists also identified a previously unknown…

Endogenous protein reverses scarring in the lungs

Relevance: 80%      Posted on: November 28, 2017

Public Release: 27-Nov-2017   Deutsches Zentrum fuer Diabetesforschung DZD The endogenous protein RAGE, which has usually been negatively associated with chronic inflammation and diabetic complications, plays a major role in the repair of DNA damage - and also appears to heal tissue damaged as a result of accelerated cell senescence. This molecular mechanism was described in a study by scientists from Heidelberg University Hospital and the German Center for Diabetes Research, which was publshed In the October issue of the journal Nucleic Acids Research. They discovered the potential therapeutic benefit of the protein in mice that are unable to produce…

Pregnant smokers may reduce harm done to baby’s lungs by taking vitamin C

Relevance: 79%      Posted on: May 21, 2018

Public Release: 21-May-2018 American Thoracic Society IMAGE: Pregnant smokers may reduce harm done to baby's lungs by taking vitamin C. Credit: ATS In a previous study, the researchers reported that daily supplemental vitamin C in pregnant women who could not quit smoking improved their newborn's pulmonary function as measured by passive respiratory compliance and the time to peak tidal expiratory flow to expiratory time. At one year, the study also found that babies whose mothers took vitamin C were less likely to develop wheeze. In the newest study, the researchers measured force expiratory flows (FEFs) at 3 and 12 months…

Students with strong hearts and lungs may make better grades, study finds

Relevance: 79%      Posted on: September 8, 2014

10 Aug 2012 Physically fit boys and girls scored higher on reading and math, research reveals ORLANDO, Fla. — Having a healthy heart and lungs may be one of the most important factors for middle school students to make good grades in math and reading, according to findings presented at the American Psychological Association’s 120th Annual Convention. “Cardiorespiratory fitness was the only factor that we consistently found to have an impact on both boys’ and girls’ grades on reading and math tests,” said study co-author Trent A. Petrie, PhD, professor of psychology and director of the Center for Sport Psychology…

Diet rich in apples and tomatoes may help repair lungs of ex-smokers, study suggests

Relevance: 79%      Posted on: December 22, 2017

Public Release: 21-Dec-2017   Study also found that regular intake of tomatoes may also help slow the natural decline in lung function among all adults Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health A study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found the natural decline in lung function over a 10-year period was slower among former smokers with a diet high in tomatoes and fruits, especially apples, suggesting certain components in these foods might help restore lung damage caused by smoking. The researchers found that adults who on average ate more than two tomatoes or more than…

How a chemo drug can help cancer spread from the breast to the lungs

Relevance: 77%      Posted on: August 8, 2017

Public Release: 7-Aug-2017   Mouse study helps explain the paradoxical pro-cancer effects of paclitaxel Ohio State University   COLUMBUS, Ohio -The very same treatment that thwarts breast cancer has a dark side -- it can fuel the spread of the disease to the lungs. Researchers at The Ohio State University studied the cascade of events that lead to metastatic cancer and found clues to why it happens, opening up the possibility of one day interfering with the medication's downsides while preserving its cancer-fighting properties in breast tissue. The front-line chemotherapy drug paclitaxel sets off a variety of molecular-level changes that…

Vitamin C may reduce harm to infants’ lungs caused by smoking during pregnancy

Relevance: 77%      Posted on: December 10, 2018

Vitamin C may reduce the harm done to lungs in infants born to mothers who smoke during their pregnancy, according to a randomized, controlled trial published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. Source: Vitamin C may reduce harm to infants' lungs caused by smoking during pregnancy

Purified bacterial extract sprayed into lungs protection against all four major classes of pathogens including those responsible for anthrax and bubonic plague

Relevance: 75%      Posted on: August 23, 2012

Washington, D.C. — A purified extract prepared from a common microbe and delivered to the lungs of laboratory mice in a spray set off a healthy immune response and provided powerful protection against all four major classes of pathogens including those responsible for anthrax and bubonic plague, according to a presentation at the American Society for Cell Biology’s 47th Annual Meeting. In addition, when the researchers exposed another group of mice to an aerosol of live Streptococcus pneumoniae, the only animals that survived were the ones that had been pre-treated with the spray. A total of 83 percent of these…

Curcumin may protect premature infants’ lungs

Relevance: 75%      Posted on: July 5, 2013

Contact: Laura Mecoy lmecoy@labiomed.org 310-546-5860 Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (LA BioMed) LA BioMed research finds substance in turmeric provides lasting protection LOS ANGELES - (July 2, 2013) - Turmeric, a key ingredient in spicy curry dishes, has long been known to have medicinal values. Now new research finds a substance in turmeric, curcumin, may provide lasting protection against potentially deadly lung damage in premature infants. Premature infants often need the assistance of ventilators and forced oxygen therapy because they're frequently born with inadequate lung function. These therapies can cause the infants to suffer lasting lung…

Dietary antioxidants may help repair the Lungs

Relevance: 75%      Posted on: January 24, 2018

Dietary antioxidants may help repair the Lungs Over a 10 year period researchers observed that regular intake of tomatoes may help slow the natural decline in lung function among all adults as well as other findings. Dietary antioxidants and ten-year lung function decline in adults from the ECRHS survey. European Respiratory Journal, December 2017 DOI: 10.1183/13993003.02286-2016

Impact on lungs of 1 cannabis joint equal to up to 5 cigarettes

Relevance: 75%      Posted on: August 3, 2007

Public release date: 30-Jul-2007 A single cannabis joint has the same effect on the lungs as smoking up to five cigarettes in one go, indicates research published ahead of print in the journal Thorax. The researchers base their findings on 339 adults up to the age of 70, selected from an ongoing study of respiratory health, and categorised into four different groups. Cannabis smokers complained of wheeze, cough, chest tightness and phlegm. But emphysema, the progressive and crippling lung disease, was only seen in those who smoked tobacco, either alone or in combination. It diminished the numbers of small fine…

Purified bacterial extract sprayed into lungs ramps up innate immune system – Haemophilus influenzae provided powerful protection against all four major classes of pathogens including those responsible for anthrax and bubonic plague

Relevance: 75%      Posted on: December 5, 2007

Public release date: 3-Dec-2007 Washington, D.C. -- A purified extract prepared from a common microbe and delivered to the lungs of laboratory mice in a spray set off a healthy immune response and provided powerful protection against all four major classes of pathogens including those responsible for anthrax and bubonic plague, according to a presentation at the American Society for Cell Biology’s 47th Annual Meeting. In addition, when the researchers exposed another group of mice to an aerosol of live Streptococcus pneumoniae, the only animals that survived were the ones that had been pre-treated with the spray. A total of…

Consciousness and awareness confirmed after the heart, lungs and brain cease functioning

Relevance: 75%      Posted on: October 9, 2014

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE: 7-Oct-2014 Results of study of the human mind and consciousness at the time of death available// Results of study of the human mind and consciousness at the time of death available The results of a four-year international study of 2060 cardiac arrest cases across 15 hospitals published and available now on ScienceDirect. The study concludes: The themes relating to the experience of death appear far broader than what has been understood so far, or what has been described as so called near-death experiences. In some cases of cardiac arrest, memories of visual awareness compatible with so called…

Rodent study finds artificial butter chemical harmful to lungs: inhaled diacetyl vapors for three months, developed lymphocytic bronchiolitis

Relevance: 73%      Posted on: September 5, 2012

Contact: Robin Mackar rmackar@niehs.nih.gov 919-541-0073 NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences A new study shows that exposure to a chemical called diacetyl, a component of artificial butter flavoring, can be harmful to the nose and airways of mice. Scientists at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of the National Institutes of Health, conducted the study because diacetyl has been implicated in causing obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) in humans. OB is a debilitating but rare lung disease, which has been detected recently in workers who inhale significant concentrations of the flavoring in microwave popcorn packaging plants. When laboratory mice…

Rodent study finds artificial butter chemical harmful to lungs

Relevance: 73%      Posted on: March 8, 2008

Public release date: 13-Mar-2008 A new study shows that exposure to a chemical called diacetyl, a component of artificial butter flavoring, can be harmful to the nose and airways of mice. Scientists at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of the National Institutes of Health, conducted the study because diacetyl has been implicated in causing obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) in humans. OB is a debilitating but rare lung disease, which has been detected recently in workers who inhale significant concentrations of the flavoring in microwave popcorn packaging plants. When laboratory mice inhaled diacetyl vapors for three months, they…

155th Health Research Report 17 MAY 2013

Relevance: 18%      Posted on: May 17, 2013

    Health Research Report 155th Issue Date 17 May 2013 Compiled By Ralph Turchiano www.vit.bz www.youtube.com/vhfilm  www.facebook.com/engineeringevil www.healthresearchreport.me  In this issue: Vitamin C may head off lung problems in babies born to pregnant smokers Magnesium may be as important to kids' bone health as calcium Preterm infants may need 800 IU of vitamin D3 per day Parents who suck on their infants' pacifiers may protect their children against developing allergy Restless legs syndrome, insomnia and brain chemistry: A tangled mystery solved? Carnitine supplement may improve survival rates of children with heart defects World first clinical trial supports use of…

155th Health Research Report 17 MAY 2013

Relevance: 18%      Posted on: May 17, 2013

Health Research Report 155th Issue Date 17 May 2013 Compiled By Ralph Turchiano www.vit.bz www.youtube.com/vhfilm  www.facebook.com/engineeringevil www.healthresearchreport.me    In this issue: Vitamin C may head off lung problems in babies born to pregnant smokers Magnesium may be as important to kids' bone health as calcium Preterm infants may need 800 IU of vitamin D3 per day Parents who suck on their infants' pacifiers may protect their children against developing allergy Restless legs syndrome, insomnia and brain chemistry: A tangled mystery solved? Carnitine supplement may improve survival rates of children with heart defects World first clinical trial supports use of Kava…

155 Health Research Report 17 May 2013

Relevance: 18%      Posted on: December 10, 2014

Health Research Report 155th Issue Date 17 May 2013 Compiled By Ralph Turchiano www.vit.bz www.youtube.com/vhfilm www.facebook.com/engineeringevil www.healthresearchreport.me 120922_0002 In this issue: Vitamin C may head off lung problems in babies born to pregnant smokers Magnesium may be as important to kids' bone health as calcium Preterm infants may need 800 IU of vitamin D3 per day Parents who suck on their infants' pacifiers may protect their children against developing allergy Restless legs syndrome, insomnia and brain chemistry: A tangled mystery solved? Carnitine supplement may improve survival rates of children with heart defects World first clinical trial supports use of Kava…

161st Health Research Report 10 AUG 2013

Relevance: 14%      Posted on: August 10, 2013

Health Research Report 161st Issue Date 10 AUG 2013 Compiled By Ralph Turchiano www.vit.bz www.youtube.com/vhfilm  www.facebook.com/engineeringevil www.healthresearchreport.me      In this issue: 1.       Plant-Based Compound May Inhibit HIV Infection, Research Shows 2.       Methamphetamine increases susceptibility to deadly fungal infection 3.       Exercise May be the Best Medicine for Alzheimer's 4.       Study finds evidence of nerve damage in around half of fibromyalgia patients 5.       Blocking sugar intake may reduce cancer risk or progression in obese and diabetic people 6.       Fatty acids could aid cancer prevention and treatment 7.       Illinois scientists put cancer-fighting power back into frozen broccoli 8.       Diets of Pregnant Women…

‘Beneficial inflammation’ May Promote Healing in Pulmonary Fibrosis

Relevance: 14%      Posted on: April 25, 2014

April 23, 2014 DENVER - Inflammation has long been considered an integral part of the biological process that leads to deadly scarring in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. New research at National Jewish Health, however, suggests that a little inflammation may also be crucial to the healing and repair processes in the lungs. Elizabeth Redente, PhD, assistant professor of cell biology at National Jewish Health, and her colleagues report in the April 2014 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology that the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α can speed recovery of injured lungs and accelerate the resolution of established fibrosis…

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