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Brain degeneration in Huntington’s disease caused by amino acid deficiency ( Cysteine )

Relevance: 100%      Posted on: March 28, 2014

Highlights: - and people with Huntington's disease: loss of the ability to make the amino acid cysteine. They also found that disease progression slowed in mice that were fed a diet rich in cysteine, which is found in foods such as wheat germ and whey protein. * advanced online publication of Nature on March 26 - http://healthresearchreport.me/2014/03/27/brain-degeneration-in-huntingtons-disease-caused-by-amino-acid-deficiency-cysteine/ Related articles Brain degeneration in Huntington's disease caused by amino acid deficiency ( Cysteine ) Brain Degeneration In Huntington's Disease Caused By Amino Acid Deficiency Amino acid deficiency leads to brain degeneration in Huntington's disease Brain degeneration in Huntington's disease caused by amino…

Omega-3 fatty acid intake linked associated with a 42 percent lower risk of age-related macular degeneration

Relevance: 95%      Posted on: March 23, 2014

Public release date: 14-Mar-2011 CHICAGO – Regular consumption of fish and omega-3 fatty acids found in fish is associated with a significantly reduced risk of developing age-related macular degeneration in women, according to a report posted online today that will appear in the June issue of Archives of Ophthalmology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. “An estimated nine million U.S. adults aged 40 years and older show signs of age-related macular degeneration (AMD),” the authors write as background information in the article. “An additional 7.3 million persons have early age-related macular degeneration, which is usually associated with moderate or no vision…

Brain degeneration in Huntington’s disease caused by amino acid deficiency ( Cysteine )

Relevance: 93%      Posted on: March 27, 2014

Public Release: 26-Mar-2014 In mice, dietary changes slow down progression of the disease Working with genetically engineered mice, Johns Hopkins neuroscientists report they have identified what they believe is the cause of the vast disintegration of a part of the brain called the corpus striatum in rodents and people with Huntington's disease: loss of the ability to make the amino acid cysteine. They also found that disease progression slowed in mice that were fed a diet rich in cysteine, which is found in foods such as wheat germ and whey protein. Their results suggest further investigation into cysteine supplementation as…

High levels of vitamin D appear to lower risk of age-related macular degeneration in young women

Relevance: 91%      Posted on: March 29, 2014

Public release date: 11-Apr-2011 High levels of vitamin D in the bloodstream appear to be associated with a decreased risk of developing early age-related macular degeneration among women younger than 75 years, according to a report in the April issue of Archives of Ophthalmology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. “Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a chronic, late-onset disease that results in degeneration of the macula, is the leading cause of adult irreversible vision loss in developed countries,” the authors write as background information in the article. “Age-related macular degeneration affects approximately 9 percent (8.5 million) of Americans aged 40 years and…

A high omega-3 fatty acid diet reduces retinal lesions in a murine model of macular degeneration

Relevance: 89%      Posted on: October 25, 2012

2009 study posted for filing Contact: Angela Colmone acolmone@asip.org 301-634-7953 American Journal of Pathology The 'see food' diet Bethesda, MD — Current research suggests that a diet high in omega-3 fatty acids may help prevent one of the leading causes of legal blindness among the elderly. The related report by Tuo et al, "A high omega-3 fatty acid diet reduces retinal lesions in a murine model of macular degeneration," appears in the August 2009 issue of the American Journal of Pathology. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), loss of vision in the center of the visual field (macula) due to retinal damage,…

Compound found in rosemary protects against macular degeneration in laboratory model

Relevance: 88%      Posted on: November 30, 2012

Contact: Heather Buschman, Ph.D. hbuschman@sanfordburnham.org 858-795-5343 Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute Sanford-Burnham researchers discover that carnosic acid, a component of the herb rosemary, promotes eye health in rodents—providing a possible new approach for treating conditions such as age-related macular degeneration LA JOLLA, Calif., November 27, 2012 – Herbs widely used throughout history in Asian and early European cultures have received renewed attention by Western medicine in recent years. Scientists are now isolating the active compounds in many medicinal herbs and documenting their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. In a study published in the journal Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, Stuart A. Lipton,…

Compound found in rosemary protects against macular degeneration in laboratory model

Relevance: 88%      Posted on: November 30, 2012

Contact: Heather Buschman, Ph.D. hbuschman@sanfordburnham.org 858-795-5343 Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute Sanford-Burnham researchers discover that carnosic acid, a component of the herb rosemary, promotes eye health in rodents—providing a possible new approach for treating conditions such as age-related macular degeneration       IMAGE:   Left: This shows control cells exposed to hydrogen peroxide. Right: This shows cells treated with carnosic acid are protected from hydrogen peroxide. Live cells are stained green, dead cells are...Click here for more information.   LA JOLLA, Calif., November 27, 2012 – Herbs widely used throughout history in Asian and early European cultures have received renewed attention by…

Compound found in rosemary protects against macular degeneration in laboratory model

Relevance: 88%      Posted on: November 3, 2014

Sanford-Burnham researchers discover that carnosic acid, a component of the herb rosemary, promotes eye health in rodents—providing a possible new approach for treating conditions such as age-related macular degeneration LA JOLLA, Calif., November 27, 2012 – Herbs widely used throughout history in Asian and early European cultures have received renewed attention by Western medicine in recent years. Scientists are now isolating the active compounds in many medicinal herbs and documenting their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. In a study published in the journal Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, Stuart A. Lipton, M.D., Ph.D. and colleagues at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (Sanford-Burnham)…

An orange a day keeps macular degeneration away: 15-year study

Relevance: 86%      Posted on: July 16, 2018

Public Release: 12-Jul-2018   A new study has shown that people who regularly eat oranges are less likely to develop macular degeneration than people who do not eat oranges Westmead Institute for Medical Research   Credit: Westmead Institute for Medical Research A new study has shown that people who regularly eat oranges are less likely to develop macular degeneration than people who do not eat oranges. Researchers at the Westmead Institute for Medical Research interviewed more than 2,000 Australian adults aged over 50 and followed them over a 15-year period. The research showed that people who ate at least one…

Eating leafy greens could help prevent macular degeneration

Relevance: 86%      Posted on: October 22, 2018

Public Release: 18-Oct-2018   Westmead Institute for Medical Research A new study has shown that eating vegetable nitrates, found mainly in green leafy vegetables and beetroot, could help reduce your risk of developing early-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Researchers at the Westmead Institute for Medical Research interviewed more than 2,000 Australian adults aged over 49 and followed them over a 15-year period. The research showed that people who ate between 100 to 142 mgs of vegetable nitrates each day had a 35% lower risk of developing early AMD than people who ate less than 69mgs of vegetable nitrates each day.…

Exercise may slow progression of retinal degeneration

Relevance: 83%      Posted on: February 14, 2014

Animal study points to possible behavioral therapy for people with macular degeneration Washington, DC — Moderate  aerobic exercise helps to preserve the structure and function of nerve cells in  the retina after damage, according to an animal study appearing February 12 in The Journal of Neuroscience. The  findings suggest exercise may be able to slow the progression of retinal  degenerative diseases. Age-related macular degeneration, one of the leading causes of blindness in the  elderly, is caused by the death of light-sensing nerve cells in the retina  called photoreceptors. Although several studies in animals and humans point to  the protective effects…

Macular Degeneration risk reduced 60% by eating Oranges

Relevance: 78%      Posted on: July 18, 2018

Macular Degeneration risk reduced 60% by eating Oranges The research showed that people who ate at least one serving of oranges every day had more than a 60% reduced risk of developing late macular degeneration 15 years later. Bamini Gopinath Gerald Liew Annette Kifley Victoria M Flood Nichole Joachim Joshua R Lewis Jonathan M Hodgson Paul Mitchell. Dietary flavonoids and the prevalence and 15-y incidence of age-related macular degeneration. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2018 DOI: 10.1093/ajcn/nqy114

New vitamin-based treatment that could reduce muscle degeneration in muscular dystrophy: Niacin pre-cursor NAD+

Relevance: 78%      Posted on: October 26, 2012

Contact: Bryan Ghosh bghosh@plos.org 44-122-344-2837 Public Library of Science Boosting the activity of a vitamin-sensitive cell adhesion pathway has the potential to counteract the muscle degeneration and reduced mobility caused by muscular dystrophies, according to a research team led by scientists at the University of Maine. The discovery, published 23 October in the open access journal PLOS Biology, is particularly important for congenital muscular dystrophies, which are progressive, debilitating and often lethal diseases that currently remain without cure. The researchers found that they could improve muscle structure and function in a zebrafish version of muscular dystrophy by supplying a common…

Macular Degeneration drugs may do More harm than good ( anti-VEGF drugs )

Relevance: 78%      Posted on: October 26, 2012

Scripps Research Institute Study Suggests Caution and Further Studies on Drugs Used to Treat Macular Degeneration LA JOLLA, CA – October 24, 2012 – Millions of people with “wet” macular degeneration are prescribed a class of medication known as anti-VEGF drugs. But now scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found that a drastic reduction of VEGF activity may do more harm than good. In the new study, the researchers deleted the gene for the blood-vessel growth factor VEGF, which has been implicated in stimulating abnormal blood vessel growth in a range of cancers and eye diseases, from cells…

New vitamin-based treatment that could reduce muscle degeneration in muscular dystrophy

Relevance: 78%      Posted on: October 25, 2014

02 NOV 2012 Boosting the activity of a vitamin-sensitive cell adhesion pathway has the potential to counteract the muscle degeneration and reduced mobility caused by muscular dystrophies, according to a research team led by scientists at the University of Maine. The discovery, published 23 October in the open access journal PLOS Biology, is particularly important for congenital muscular dystrophies, which are progressive, debilitating and often lethal diseases that currently remain without cure. The researchers found that they could improve muscle structure and function in a zebrafish version of muscular dystrophy by supplying a common cellular chemical (or its precursor, vitamin…

Boosting the potency of a broccoli-related compound yields a possible treatment for macular degeneration

Relevance: 78%      Posted on: July 9, 2016

Public Release: 6-Jul-2016 Boosting the potency of a broccoli-related compound yields a possible treatment for macular degeneration Buck Institute study also shows that palmitoleic acid protects the retina from environmental damage in mouse models of disease Buck Institute for Research on Aging Buck researchers boosted the potency of a broccoli-related compound by ten times and identified it as a possible treatment for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of vision loss affecting more than 10 million older Americans. The research, published in Scientific Reports, also highlights the role of lipid metabolism in maintaining the health of the retina, reporting…

Study finds association between poor diet, age-related macular degeneration

Relevance: 76%      Posted on: December 11, 2019

Participants who ate a diet high in red and processed meat, fried food, refined grains and high-fat dairy were three times more likely to develop late-stage age-related macular degeneration. Source: Study finds association between poor diet, age-related macular degeneration

Postmenopause vitamin D deficiency associated with disc degeneration and lower back pain

Relevance: 76%      Posted on: February 17, 2020

Lumbar disc degeneration and resulting lower back pain become greater concerns with age and disproportionately affect women more than men, likely as a result of decreasing estrogen levels during menopause. A new study demonstrates that vitamin D deficiency, smoking, high body mass index (BMI), and osteoporosis are risk factors for greater back pain. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). Source: Postmenopause vitamin D deficiency associated with disc degeneration and lower back pain

Regular aspirin use 10 or more years ago associated with increased risk of type of age-related macular degeneration

Relevance: 76%      Posted on: November 12, 2014

28 DEC 2012 CHICAGO ‑ Among nearly 5,000 study participants, regular aspirin use reported ten years prior was associated with a small but statistically significant increase in the risk of neovascular age‑related macular degeneration, according to a study in the December 19 issue of JAMA. “Aspirin use in the United States is widespread, with an estimated 19.3 percent of adults reporting regular consumption, and reported use increases with age,” according to background information in the study. “The results of cross-sectional studies of aspirin use and its relation to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) have been inconsistent. AMD is a potentially blinding…

Regular aspirin use 10 or more years ago associated with increased risk of type of age-related macular degeneration

Relevance: 76%      Posted on: December 19, 2012

Contact: Susan Lampert Smith slsmith2@wisc.edu 608-262-7335 JAMA and Archives Journals CHICAGO ‑ Among nearly 5,000 study participants, regular aspirin use reported ten years prior was associated with a small but statistically significant increase in the risk of neovascular age‑related macular degeneration, according to a study in the December 19 issue of JAMA.   "Aspirin use in the United States is widespread, with an estimated 19.3 percent of adults reporting regular consumption, and reported use increases with age," according to background information in the study. "The results of cross-sectional studies of aspirin use and its relation to age-related macular degeneration (AMD)…

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