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Natural supplement found to improve skin elasticity by 25 percent and skin hydration by 8 percent

Relevance: 100%      Posted on: June 9, 2014

Pycnogenol (French maritime pine bark extract) shown to improve visible signs of aging in new study (Jan. 25, 2012) – HOBOKEN, NJ – Human skin is the body’s first line of defense and often mirrors the health, nutritional status and age of a person. Over time, skin shows signs of aging due to the gradual breakdown of collagen and elastin. However, skin can be rebuilt and made healthier no matter one’s age. Natural supplement Pycnogenol® (pic-noj-en-all), an antioxidant plant extract from the bark of the French maritime pine tree, was found to improve skin hydration and elasticity in women in…

Having eczema may reduce your risk of skin cancer

Relevance: 79%      Posted on: May 9, 2014

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE: 5-May-2014 Eczema caused by defects in the skin could reduce the risk of developing skin cancer, according to new research by King's College London. The immune response triggered by eczema could help prevent tumour formation by shedding potentially cancerous cells from the skin. There is ongoing debate surrounding allergic diseases and their impact on the likelihood of developing cancer, with some studies suggesting that eczema is associated with a reduced risk of skin cancer. However, it is difficult to draw firm conclusions based on studies of human populations because eczema symptoms vary in severity and drugs used…

Lower Antioxidant Level Might Explain Higher Skin-Cancer Rate In Males

Relevance: 75%      Posted on: May 9, 2014

23 Nov- 2011 COLUMBUS, Ohio – Men are three times more likely than women to develop a common form of skin cancer but medical science doesn’t know why. A new study may provide part of the answer. Researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James) have found that male mice had lower levels of an important skin antioxidant than female mice and higher levels of certain cancer-linked inflammatory cells. The antioxidant, a protein called catalase, inhibits skin cancer by mopping up hydrogen peroxide and…

Mice at risk of asthma, allergies can fight off skin cancer

Relevance: 72%      Posted on: October 18, 2012

  Contact: Julia Evangelou Strait straitj@wustl.edu 314-286-0141 Washington University School of Medicine A molecule involved in asthma and allergies has now been shown to make mice resistant to skin cancer, according to scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The molecule, called TSLP (thymic stromal lymphopoietin), is produced by damaged skin and activates the immune system. Chronic low levels of TSLP are suspected in making the immune system oversensitive to what should be a harmless environment, leading to the skin rashes and overproduction of mucus common in allergies and asthma. "But at extremely high levels, TSLP appears…

Sun exposure and sun-sensitive skin type decreased risk for pancreatic cancer

Relevance: 66%      Posted on: August 13, 2014

29 JUN 2012 LAKE TAHOE, Nev. — High levels of ultraviolet radiation at an individual’s birth location, sun-sensitive skin type and a history of skin cancer each decreased risk for pancreatic cancer, according to study results presented at the American Association for Cancer Research’s Pancreatic Cancer: Progress and Challenges conference, held here June 18-21. Rachel Neale, Ph.D., principal investigator at Queensland Institute of Medical Research in Queensland, Australia, presented the results of a population-based, case-control study that adds to the already conflicting data about sun exposure, vitamin D gained from sun exposure and cancer risk. “Several ecological studies, including one…

Natural products from plants protect skin during cancer radiotherapy

Relevance: 65%      Posted on: July 25, 2014

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE: 24-Jul-2014 Radiotherapy for cancer involves exposing the patient or their tumor more directly to ionizing radiation, such as gamma rays or X-rays. The radiation damages the cancer cells irreparably. Unfortunately, such radiation is also harmful to healthy tissue, particularly the skin over the site of the tumor, which is then at risk of hair loss, dermatological problems and even skin cancer. As such finding ways to protect the overlying skin are keenly sought. Writing in the International Journal of Low Radiation, Faruck Lukmanul Hakkim of the University of Nizwa, Oman and Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, Japan, and colleagues…

More evidence that caffeine lowers risk of skin cancer

Relevance: 65%      Posted on: April 16, 2014

Public release date: 15-Aug-2011 There might be a time when instead of just drinking that morning cup of coffee you lather it on your skin as a way of preventing harmful sun damage or skin cancer. A new Rutgers study strengthens the theory that caffeine guards against certain skin cancers at the molecular level by inhibiting a protein enzyme in the skin, known as ATR. Scientists believe that based on what they have learned studying mice, caffeine applied directly to the skin might help prevent damaging UV light from causing skin cancer.   Prior research indicated that mice that were…

Coffee consumption inversely associated with risk of most common form of skin cancer

Relevance: 64%      Posted on: August 26, 2014

29 JUL 2012 PHILADELPHIA — Increasing the number of cups of caffeinated coffee you drink could lower your risk of developing the most common form of skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma, according to a study published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. “Our data indicate that the more caffeinated coffee you consume, the lower your risk of developing basal cell carcinoma,” said Jiali Han, Ph.D., associate professor at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School in Boston and Harvard School of Public Health. “I would not recommend increasing your coffee intake based on these…

Merkel cell polyomavirus linked to Skin Cancer : Developed a mutation that causes it to integrate into host-cell DNA

Relevance: 62%      Posted on: October 25, 2012

2009 study posted for filing   Study Links Virus To Some Cases Of Common Skin Cancer   COLUMBUS, Ohio – A virus discovered last year in a rare form of skin cancer has also been found in people with the second most common form of skin cancer among Americans, according to researchers at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute.     The researchers examined tissue samples from 58 people with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), a highly curable form of skin cancer that is expected to affect more than 200,000 Americans this…

Study Links Virus To Some Cases Of Common Skin Cancer – Merkel cell polyomavirus

Relevance: 61%      Posted on: August 2, 0209

Public release date: 30-Jul-2009   COLUMBUS, Ohio – A virus discovered last year in a rare form of skin cancer has also been found in people with the second most common form of skin cancer among Americans, according to researchers at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute. The researchers examined tissue samples from 58 people with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), a highly curable form of skin cancer that is expected to affect more than 200,000 Americans this year. They identified the Merkel cell polyomavirus in more than a third of the…

Fermented milk made by Lactococcus lactis H61 improves skin of healthy young women

Relevance: 59%      Posted on: October 16, 2014

"Sebum content in the cheek rose significantly in the H61-fermented milk group, but not in the conventional yogurt group" Results of Japanese study published in the Journal of Dairy Science® Philadelphia, PA, October 13, 2014 – There has been much interest in the potential for using probiotic bacteria for treating skin diseases and other disorders. Japanese researchers have now found that milk that has been fermented using a probiotic dairy starter can also benefit the skin of young healthy women, reports the Journal of Dairy Science®. Probiotics have been defined by the Food and Agriculture Organization-World Health Organization as "live…

University of Arizona researchers identify natural food additive that may prevent skin cancer

Relevance: 59%      Posted on: January 29, 2016

Public Release: 28-Jan-2016   Unlike sunscreen, the nutritional compound protects skin from the inside out University of Arizona, College of Pharmacy TUCSON, Ariz. - Researchers at the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy have discovered that a compound found in the natural food additive annatto prevents the formation of cancer cells and skin damage from UV radiation in mice. In the future the compound, bixin, may be valuable in the prevention and treatment of human skin cancers. Georg Wondrak, PhD, associate professor, and Donna Zhang, PhD, professor, both members of the University of Arizona Cancer Center, recently published a study…

Silibinin, found in milk thistle, protects against UV-induced skin cancer

Relevance: 58%      Posted on: January 31, 2013

By Garth Sundem in In the Lab · January 30, 2013 · Rajesh Agarwal, PhD, shows that silibinin, found in milk thistle, protects against UVB damage and kills cells damaged by UVA — but is not at all toxic in healthy cells. A pair of University of Colorado Cancer Center studies published this month show that the milk thistle extract, silibinin, kills skin cells mutated by UVA radiation and protects against damage by UVB radiation – thus protecting against UV-induced skin cancer and photo-aging. “When you have a cell affected by UV radiation, you either want to repair it or…

Silibinin, found in milk thistle, protects against UV-induced skin cancer

Relevance: 58%      Posted on: January 31, 2013

  By Garth Sundem in In the Lab · January 30, 2013 ·   Rajesh Agarwal, PhD, shows that silibinin, found in milk thistle, protects against UVB damage and kills cells damaged by UVA — but is not at all toxic in healthy cells. A pair of University of Colorado Cancer Center studies published this month show that the milk thistle extract, silibinin, kills skin cells mutated by UVA radiation and protects against damage by UVB radiation – thus protecting against UV-induced skin cancer and photo-aging. “When you have a cell affected by UV radiation, you either want to repair…

Silibinin, found in milk thistle, protects against UV-induced skin cancer

Relevance: 58%      Posted on: November 19, 2014

By Garth Sundem in In the Lab · January 30, 2013 · Rajesh Agarwal, PhD, shows that silibinin, found in milk thistle, protects against UVB damage and kills cells damaged by UVA — but is not at all toxic in healthy cells. A pair of University of Colorado Cancer Center studies published this month show that the milk thistle extract, silibinin, kills skin cells mutated by UVA radiation and protects against damage by UVB radiation – thus protecting against UV-induced skin cancer and photo-aging. “When you have a cell affected by UV radiation, you either want to repair it or…

Suggested link between radon and skin cancer

Relevance: 57%      Posted on: May 7, 2014

Public release date: 14-Nov-2011 A new study published this week suggests that a link may exist between radon exposure and non-melanoma skin cancer Researchers from the European Centre for Environment & Human Health (part of the Peninsula College of Medicine & Dentistry) have detected a connection following analysis of data on radon exposure and skin cancer cases from across southwest England. The study, which looked at small geographical areas across Devon and Cornwall, builds upon a similar study conducted 15 years ago. Radon is a naturally occurring, radioactive gas found in soil and bedrock common in parts of the southwest.…

Ingredient found in soap can alter ‘wettability’ of your skin

Relevance: 57%      Posted on: June 27, 2017

Public Release: 27-Jun-2017   Binghamton University Caption Guy German, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Binghamton University, State University of New York, along with other researchers, showed that the wettability of this layer of skin can be controlled through treatment with solutions of the anionic surfactant known as sodium lauryl sulfate, buffered to different pH values. Credit: Binghamton University, State University of New York BINGHAMTON, NY - It's possible to alter the wettability of your skin using an ingredient commonly found in cosmetic cleaners, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. The outermost layer of…

Diet rich in tomatoes cuts skin cancer in half in mice

Relevance: 57%      Posted on: July 14, 2017

Public Release: 13-Jul-2017   Discovery builds on previous evidence of cancer-prevention benefits Ohio State University COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Daily tomato consumption appeared to cut the development of skin cancer tumors by half in a mouse study at The Ohio State University. The new study of how nutritional interventions can alter the risk for skin cancers appeared online in the journal Scientific Reports. It found that male mice fed a diet of 10 percent tomato powder daily for 35 weeks, then exposed to ultraviolet light, experienced, on average, a 50 percent decrease in skin cancer tumors compared to mice that ate…

New study highlights strong anti-cancer properties of soybeans: inhibited cancer cell growth by 73% for colon cancer, 70% for liver cancer and 68% for lung cancer

Relevance: 57%      Posted on: March 21, 2013

Contact: Sacha Boucherie S.Boucherie@elsevier.com 31-204-853-564 Elsevier First study to report that proteins found in soybeans, could inhibit growth of colon, liver and lung cancers, published in Food Research International Soybean meal is a bi-product following oil extraction from soybean seeds. It is rich in protein, which usually makes up around 40% of the nutritional components of the seeds and dependent on the line, and can also contain high oleic acid (a monounsaturated omega-9 fatty acid). The study looked at the role soybeans could have in the prevention of cancer. Using a variety of soybean lines which were high in oleic…

Scientists reverse aging-associated skin wrinkles and hair loss in a mouse model

Relevance: 56%      Posted on: July 21, 2018

Public Release: 20-Jul-2018A gene mutation causes wrinkled skin and hair loss; turning off that mutation restores the mouse to normal appearance.University of Alabama at BirminghamBIRMINGHAM, Ala. - Wrinkled skin and hair loss are hallmarks of aging. What if they could be reversed?Keshav Singh, Ph.D., and colleagues have done just that, in a mouse model developed at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. When a mutation leading to mitochondrial dysfunction is induced, the mouse develops wrinkled skin and extensive, visible hair loss in a matter of weeks. When the mitochondrial function is restored by turning off the gene responsible for mitochondrial…

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