Weather can affect pain tolerance, reports study in PAIN®

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September 21, 2021  – Can the weather affect pain from conditions like arthritis or migraine? It may sound like an old superstition – but on some standard quantitative sensory tests, weather-related factors do indeed affect pain tolerance, suggests a study in PAIN®the official publication of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP)The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

“Although observational, these findings suggest that weather has a causal, non-linear, dynamic effect on pain tolerance,” according to the new research, led by Erlend Hoftun Farbu, PhD student at UiT – The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø. But it remains unclear if the link between weather and pain involves physiological or psychological factors, or a combination of factors.

Weather-related factors affect two standard pain assessments

The study included participants in the Tromsø Study, an ongoing study of the health of people in that city in Northern Norway, located north of the Arctic Circle. About 19,500 participants, average age 57 years, were evaluated on two quantitative sensory tests, widely used in research studies. The pressure pain tolerance test (PPT) measured the subjects’ ability to tolerate pain from steadily increasing pressure applied to the lower leg. The cold pain tolerance test (CPT) measured how long they could tolerate immersion of the hand in cold water.

Results of the pain tolerance tests were analyzed in relation to data on weather conditions – temperature, barometric pressure, precipitation, relative humidity, and wind speed. Associations between pain tolerance and meteorological factors were assessed, along with seasonal or shorter-term variations.

Overall, the PPT results showed no significant seasonal variation and were not strongly related to weather-related variables when considering the whole study period. However, the correlations varied depending on the time period studied. The data suggested “non-random short-term variation” in PPT outcomes – the time frame of short-term variations  in PPT mirrored the time frame of the weather. Additionally, temperature and barometric pressure predicted future PPT values.

In contrast, the CPT results showed clear seasonal variation – subjects were able to tolerate cold-induced pain longer during colder times of year. Cold pain tolerance also varied with weather-related variables. “This fits nicely together with research on cold adaptation,” Mr. Farbu comments. “As you get used to cold, you might be able to tolerate more cold.”

He adds, “Temperature and barometric pressure seems to be most strongly related to CPT and PPT, and they predict future PPT. However, the effect of temperature is likely influenced by humidity and wind, as they might alter the heat loss.”

Many people, particularly those with chronic pain, believe that weather or weather-related factors can cause or aggravate episodes of pain. While some studies have supported associations between weather and pain, others have reached conflicting results.

“If we are correct about that the relationship is dynamic and non-linear, it might very well explain why many studies find small effects and conflicting results,” Mr. Farbu comments. “If an effect is changing over time and you average it over time, you might end up with no effect.”

The findings, especially for CPT, “should be considered when planning future studies on pain tolerance,” the researchers write. They discuss some ways in which weather might affect pain tolerance. One possible explanation is “central mechanisms,” with weather-related variables affecting parts of the brain involved in pain processing. Alternatively, weather might affect people’s mental status – as in seasonal depression, for example – which could affect their capacity to endure pain.

“In summary, it is unlikely that one singular mechanism can explain the variations in pain tolerance observed,” Mr. Farbu and coauthors conclude. “[I]t is more probable that this is the net result of many, possibly antagonistic, mechanisms.”

Click here to read “To tolerate weather and to tolerate pain two sides of the same coin? The Tromsø Study 7”

DOI: 10.1097/j.pain.0000000000002437

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About PAIN

PAIN is IASP’s official journal. Published monthly, PAIN presents original research on the nature, mechanisms, and treatment of pain. Available to IASP members as a membership benefit, this peer-reviewed journal provides a forum for the dissemination of multidisciplinary research in the basic and clinical sciences. It is cited in Current Contents and Index Medicus.

About the International Association for the Study of Pain

IASP is the leading professional organization for science, practice, and education in the field of pain. Membership is open to all professionals involved in research, diagnosis, or treatment of pain. IASP has more than 7,000 members in 133 countries, 96 National Chapters, and 25 Special Interest Groups (SIGs). IASP brings together scientists, clinicians, health-care providers, and policymakers to stimulate and support the study of pain and translate that knowledge into improved pain relief worldwide.

About Wolters Kluwer

Wolters Kluwer (WKL) is a global leader in professional information, software solutions, and services for the clinicians, nurses, accountants, lawyers, and tax, finance, audit, risk, compliance, and regulatory sectors. We help our customers make critical decisions every day by providing expert solutions that combine deep domain knowledge with advanced technology and services.

Wolters Kluwer reported 2020 annual revenues of €4.6 billion. The group serves customers in over 180 countries, maintains operations in over 40 countries, and employs approximately 19,200 people worldwide. The company is headquartered in Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands.

Wolters Kluwer provides trusted clinical technology and evidence-based solutions that engage clinicians, patients, researchers and students in effective decision-making and outcomes across healthcare. We support clinical effectiveness, learning and research, clinical surveillance and compliance, as well as data solutions. For more information about our solutions, visit https://www.wolterskluwer.com/en/health and follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter @WKHealth.

For more information, visit www.wolterskluwer.com, follow us on TwitterFacebookLinkedIn, and YouTube.

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