Influenza A vaccination associated with 6.3 times more aerosol shedding than non vaccinated

Editors Note (Ralph Turchiano): I encourage you to review the full study as I shall link it below. I am only highlighting the two outcomes that require urgent further investigation due to the rapid mutagenicity of H3N2 .

Study Quote # 1  “In adjusted models, we observed 6.3 (95% CI 1.9–21.5) times more aerosol shedding among cases with vaccination in the current and previous season compared with having no vaccination in those two seasons.”

Study Quote #2 “ The association of current and prior year vaccination with increased shedding of influenza A might lead one to speculate that certain types of prior immunity promote lung inflammation, airway closure, and aerosol generation. This first observation of the phenomenon needs confirmation. If confirmed, this observation, together with recent literature suggesting reduced protection with annual vaccination, would have implications for influenza vaccination recommendations and policies.

 

Full Text Link: http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2018/01/17/1716561115.full

mmm

VACC1

vac2

  2 comments for “Influenza A vaccination associated with 6.3 times more aerosol shedding than non vaccinated

  1. January 21, 2018 at 4:10 am

    This is quite the interesting piece of research from our national academy. It is very striking that the aerosol viral shedding is 6.3 times higher in those vaccinated versus unvaccinated. Also interesting is the finding that vaccinated individuals demonstrate increased lung inflammation. The most important part of the paper is the comment at the end noting that we really need to reconsider vaccination policy and practice. I have been expressing caution and concern about our flu vax process for years and its great to finally have some legit research demonstrating that the concern is warranted.

  2. January 24, 2018 at 10:20 am

    Reblogged this on Babble On… and commented:
    Natural immunity for the win.

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