Month: May 2009

Allergy season: Cigarettes to the rescue?

HR- Warning, many variables are not listed in this abstract from 2009. This is far from any endorsement. Public release date: 14-May-2009 – found that treatment of mast cells with a cigarette smoke-infused solution prevented the release of inflammation-inducing proteins in response to allergens

Hopkins Children’s study: Folic acid may help treat allergies, asthma

  Public release date: 30-Apr-2009 – People with the lowest folate levels (below 8 nanograms per milliliter) had 40 percent higher risk of wheezing than people with the highest folate levels (above 18 ng/ml). -People with the lowest folate levels had a 30 percent higher risk than those with the highest folate levels of having…

Chinese workers urged to puff up economy by smoking ( 2009 )

  Public Release: 5-May-2009 – service centres and corporations must consume at least 23,000 cartons of cigarettes this year.   CLIFFORD COONAN in Beijing CHINESE STATE employees are being asked to do their patriotic duty to support the local economy – by lighting up a cigarette. And no butts. In Gongan county in Hubei province,…

Research finds Kava safe and effective

Public release date: 11-May-2009 -“We’ve been able to show that Kava offers a natural alternative for the treatment of anxiety, and unlike some pharmaceutical options, has less risk of dependency and less potential of side effects,” Extract of Kava useful in treating anxiety and improving mood   Researchers at the University of Queensland in Australia…

Probiotics may help ward off postpartum obesity

Public release date: 11-May-2009 NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Pregnant women who take probiotic supplements starting in the first trimester are less likely to develop central obesity after they’ve given birth, according to a new study. Central obesity was defined as a body mass index of 30 or higher or a waist circumference greater than…

Why Antidepressants Don’t Live Up to the Hype

Public release date: 11-May-2009   – PLoS Medicine a year earlier suggested that widely used SSRIs, including Prozac, Effexor and Paxil, offer no clinically significant benefit over placebos for patients with moderate or severe depression –  – attributed 68% of the benefit from antidepressants to the placebo effect