Month: January 2012

Deer antlers inspire a new theory on osteoporosis

The loss of manganese could mean that calcium does not stick to bones and could cause osteoporosis. This is the new theory put forward by researchers at the University of Castilla-La Mancha (UCLM) in Spain after studying deer antlers. The hypothesis published this month in the Frontiers of Bioscience journal still needs to be confirmed…

High fructose consumption by adolescents may put them at cardiovascular risk

    Evidence of cardiovascular disease and diabetes risk is present in the blood of adolescents who consume a lot of fructose, a scenario that worsens in the face of excess belly fat, researchers report. An analysis of 559 adolescents age 14-18 correlated high-fructose diets with higher blood pressure, fasting glucose, insulin resistance and inflammatory…

Study examines link between vaccinations and exposure to compound widely used in food packaging

CHICAGO – Elevated exposures in children to perfluorinated compounds, which are widely used in manufacturing and food packaging, were associated with lower antibody responses to routine childhood immunizations, according to a study in the January 25 issue of JAMA. “Fluorine-substituted organic compounds have thousands of important industrial and manufacturing applications and occur widely in surfactants…

More on legal remedies for ghostwriting

In an Essay that expands on a previous proposal to use the courts to prosecute those involved in ghostwriting on the basis of it being legal fraud, Xavier Bosch from the University of Barcelona, Spain and colleagues lay out three outline specific areas of legal liability in this week’s PLoS Medicine. First, when an injured…

Are diet soft drinks bad for you?

New study finds potential link between daily consumption of diet soft drinks and risk of vascular events Individuals who drink diet soft drinks on a daily basis may be at increased risk of suffering vascular events such as stroke, heart attack, and vascular death. This is according to a new study by Hannah Gardener and…