• Images from  surveillance brochures have been leaked  online
  • The  instruments are thought to be next-generation spy gadgets
  • Vest can capture  a phone’s unique identifier number and track its location
  • Memory stick can  steal network username and password

By  Victoria Woollaston

PUBLISHED: 05:59 EST, 2  September 2013 |  UPDATED: 05:59 EST, 2 September 2013

Security experts have discovered leaked  surveillance brochures revealing what’s believed to be the next generation of  spy gadgets.

The brochures are said to be for FinFisher, a  surveillance program sold by Gamma Group, and include a wearable vest that  captures the details of nearby phones and use this information to track their  whereabouts.

Other leaked images, discovered by F-Secure,  show a memory stick that can be used to steal the username and password of a  wireless network in order to obtain personal details and banking logins, even if  the network is encrypted.

Security firm F-Secure has found leaked images from a brochure believed to be selling next-generation spy gadgets. Security firm F-Secure has found leaked images from a  brochure believed to be selling next-generation spy gadgets. The Gamma Group  brochure includes a vest, pictured, that can record the unique identifier  numbers of nearby phones, and use this number to track where those phones  go

WHAT IS A UNIQUE  IDENTIFIER?

The unique identifier number of a mobile  device is also known as the international  mobile subscriber identity (IMSI) or international mobile equipment identity  (IMEI).

These numbers are used to uniquely identify  each individual mobile device.

If a phone is stolen, for example, a network  operator can use the number to block a handset and prevent a thief from using  it.

Once a hacker, for example, has a phone’s  unique identifier number they can track its whereabouts and potentially access  it remotely.

The wearable device fitted to a vest is said  to be 41 x 33 x 18 centimetres in size.

It takes up to 90 seconds to scan and record  the unique identifier number of a nearby mobile device, also known as the  the international mobile subscriber  identity (IMSI) or international mobile equipment identity (IMEI).

The brochure claims that the device works on  any mobile network, in any country and can even be used to track phones in  moving cars.

Other gadgets listed in the leaked documents  include a bag and a car antenna that also record these unique numbers.

Once a spy, or hacker, has this number, it is  possible to track the location of the phone, and ultimately, the owner.

Technology site Ars  Technica additionally  detail a device that can ‘intercept a target’s SMS messages’ as well as create  an ‘exclusion zone’ that will prevent any phones in that area from being able to  access a mobile network.

In a blog  post, F-Secure’s CRO, Mikko Hypponen  said: ‘FinFisher is a range of attack tools developed and sold by a company  called Gamma Group.

Leaked details of the FinSpy Mobile product, pictured, can be used to record incoming and outgoing emails on mobile devices, listen in on calls and track the phone's location.Leaked details of the FinSpy Mobile product, pictured,  suggest it can be used to record incoming and outgoing emails on mobile devices,  listen in on calls and track the phone’s location. It affects iOS, Android and  BlackBerry and is also believed to be the first reference of malware for Windows  Phone

‘Recently, some FinFisher sales brochures and  presentations were leaked on the net. They contain many interesting details  about these tools.’

The tools mentioned include a FinUSB Suite  that can be used to infect computers with malware through a USB stick, as well  as the FinIntrusion Kit that can steal the username and passwords of wireless  networks, and access the files and computers on that network in order to steal  personal information and banking credentials.

Hyponnen goes on to say that this intrusion  kit appears to work even if the wireless network is secure.

Additionally, the leaked screenshots also  reference a product called FinSpy Mobile that can be used to record incoming and  outgoing emails on mobile devices, listen in on calls and track the phone’s  location.

The FinUSB Suite, pictured, can be used to infect computers with malware through a USB stick. The FinUSB Suite, pictured, can be used to infect  computers with malware through a USB stick. The FinIntrusion Kit uses USBs to  steal the username and passwords of wireless networks, and access the files and  computers on that network as well as steal banking credentials

Hyponnen adds: ‘Interestingly, the description of FinSpy Mobile  specifically  mentions they support Windows Phone.

‘This is the first  reference of any malware for Windows Phone we are aware of.’

FinSpy Mobile is also said to be able to hack  BlackBerry, iOS and Android.

FinFisher, also known as FinSpy, is  surveillance software sold by Gamma International, which is a subsidiary of the  Gamma Group.

Gamma Group specialises in surveillance and  monitoring, including equipment, software and training services.

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