Month: March 2015

A powerful natural product discovered with wide-ranging antifungal, antibacterial, anti-malaria and anti-cancer effects.

Public Release: 31-Mar-2015 Scientists reveal unique mechanism of natural product with powerful antimicrobial action Scripps Research Institute JUPITER, FL, March 31, 2015 – Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have uncovered the unique mechanism of a powerful natural product with wide-ranging antifungal, antibacterial, anti-malaria and anti-cancer effects. The new study,…

World first study reveals antibodies that may trigger psychosis in children

Public Release: 31-Mar-2015 University of Sydney A world first study revealing the presence of two antibodies in a sub-group of children experiencing their first episode of psychosis affirms a longstanding recognition that auto-immune disorders play a significant role in psychiatric illness. Antibodies defend the body against bacterial, viral, and other invaders but sometimes the body…

Exercise largely absent from US medical school curriculum, study shows

Public Release: 31-Mar-2015 Oregon State University CORVALLIS, Ore. – Exercise may play a critical role in maintaining good health, but fewer than half of the physicians trained in the United States in 2013 received formal education or training on the subject, according to new research from Oregon State University. A review of medical school curriculums…

Folic acid may help elderly weather heat waves

Public Release: 31-Mar-2015 Penn State Supplemental folic acid can enhance blood vessel dilation in older adults, according to Penn State researchers, suggesting that folic acid supplements may be an inexpensive alternative for helping older adults to increase skin blood flow during heat waves and reduce cardiovascular events. “We know that when older adults are exposed…

1,000-year-old onion and garlic remedy kills antibiotic-resistant bugs, more effective than modern antibiotics

The simple salve is more effective than modern antibiotics. FIONA MACDONALD 31 MAR 2015 A 1,000-year-old Anglo-Saxon ‘eye salve’ made from onion, garlic, wine and part of a cow’s stomach has been shown to wipe out 90 percent of antibiotic-resistantStaphylococcus aureus, otherwise known as MRSA. And it works better than modern antibiotics in both lab…

Date syrup shows promise for fighting bacterial infections

PUBLIC RELEASE: 30-MAR-2015 SOCIETY FOR GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY Date syrup – a thick, sweet liquid derived from dates that is widely consumed across the Middle East – shows antibacterial activity against a number of disease-causing bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. New research, presented today at the Society for General Microbiology’s Annual Conference in Birmingham,…

Scientists link unexplained childhood paralysis to enterovirus D68

PUBLIC RELEASE: 30-MAR-2015 UCSF-led team rules out other pathogens with comprehensive sequencing UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA – SAN FRANCISCO IMAGE: THIS IS A THREE-DIMENSIONAL IMAGE OF ENTEROVIRUS D68 (CENTER) RECONSTRUCTED FROM CRYO-ELECTRON MICROGRAPHS (BACKGROUND). CREDIT: COURTESY OF YUE LIU AND MICHAEL ROSSMANN, PURDUE UNIVERSITY. A research team led by UC San Francisco scientists has found the…

Study: Increased dietary magnesium intake associated with improved diabetes-related health outcomes

PUBLIC RELEASE: 30-MAR-2015 PORTER NOVELLI Northridge, CA (March 30, 2015) – A recent analysis published in the Journal of Human Nutrition & Food Science reveals a beneficial relationship between dietary magnesium intake and diabetes-related outcomes including decreased risk for metabolic syndrome, obesity or overweight, elevated blood pressure, and reduced HDL (good) cholesterol(1). This secondary analysis…

Low vitamin D linked to worse prognosis in type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma

PUBLIC RELEASE: 30-MAR-2015 UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER MEDICAL CENTER A new study found that people with lower vitamin D levels prior to treatment for follicular lymphoma succumb to the disease or face relapse earlier than patients with sufficient vitamin D levels in their blood. The Wilmot Cancer Institute investigation is believed to be the first to…

Oral drug normalizes blood potassium in 98 percent of kidney patients

PUBLIC RELEASE: 30-MAR-2015 High potassium increases risk of fatal cardiac arrhythmias UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER AT SAN ANTONIO SAN ANTONIO, Texas, U.S.A. (March 30, 2015) — Patients with chronic kidney disease may be treated with a class of medications called Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System inhibitors (RAASI’s). Although these drugs protect the heart and…

How to cut the calories in rice by up to 60% ( Video )

How to cut the calories in rice by up to 60% **Watch in HD** – He explains that starch can be digestible or indigestible. Starch is a component of rice, and it has both types. Unlike digestible types of starch, RS is not broken down in the small intestine, where carbohydrates normally are metabolized into…

Harmless bacteria may be helpful against meningococcal outbreaks

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015 “The drop in carriage seen in this study was faster and more persistent than that seen after vaccination. The harmless bacterial strain was also active against more varieties of N. meningitidis. “ Study suggests possible new approach to prevent spread of disease-causing bacteria Infectious Diseases Society of America Share Print E-Mail Nasal…

Roseroot herb shows promise as potential depression treatment option, Penn team finds

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015 Study is the first randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, comparison trial of oral R. rosea extract versus conventional antidepressant for mild to moderate major depressive disorder University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine PHILADELPHIA — Rhodiola rosea (R. rosea), or roseroot, may be a beneficial treatment option for major depressive disorder (MDD), according to results…

Chikungunya virus may be coming to a city near you — learn the facts

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015 University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston The mosquito-borne chikungunya virus has been the subject of increasing attention as it spreads throughout South America, Central America, the Caribbean and Mexico. This painful and potentially debilitating disease is predicted to soon spread to the U.S. The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston’s…

Pregnant women not getting enough omega-3, critical for infant development

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015 APrON study suggests pregnant & lactating women not meeting recommended intake Canadian Science Publishing (NRC Research Press) Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition (APrON) is a birth cohort involving over two thousand women and their infants from Calgary and Edmonton that was funded by Alberta Innovates Health Solutions and includes researchers at the…

Mothers Hepatitis B infection may give infants a better survival advantage to counteract bacterial infection during early life.

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015 HBV exposure matures infants’ immune systems Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore IMAGE: This is the hepatitis B virus surface antigen in cord blood cells from HBV positive mothers. Credit: Michelle Hong / Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore A Singapore led study has shown that Hepatitis B Virus Infection (HBV) exposure increases the…

Study finds why drug for type II diabetes makes people incredibly hungry

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015 Georgia State University ATLANTA–Medication used to treat patients with type II diabetes activates sensors on brain cells that increase hunger, causing people taking this drug to gain more body fat, according to researchers at Georgia State University, Oregon Health and Science University, Georgia Regents University and Charlie Norwood Veterans Administration Medical Center.…

Common bacteria on verge of becoming antibiotic-resistant superbugs

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015 Washington University School of Medicine Bacteria that cause many hospital-associated infections are ready to quickly share genes that allow them to resist powerful antibiotics. The illustration, based on electron micrographs and created by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, shows one of these antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Credit: CDC/James Archer Antibiotic resistance is…