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Omega-3 fatty acids, and in particular DHA, are associated with increased attention scores in adolescents

Read Time:2 Minute, 37 Second Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is associated with a greater capacity for selective and sustained attention in adolescents, while alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is associated with lower impulsivity, according to a study co-led by ISGlobal, a center supported by the “la Caixa” Foundation and the Pere Virgili Institute for Health Research (ISPV). The results confirm the importance of having a diet that provides sufficient amounts of these polyunsaturated fatty acids for a healthy brain development. During adolescence, important structural and functional changes occur in the brain, especially in the prefrontal area, which plays a major role in controlling attention. On the […]
Read more » Omega-3 fatty acids, and in particular DHA, are associated with increased attention scores in adolescents

Study finds folic acid treatment is associated with decreased risk of suicide attempts

Read Time:4 Minute, 40 Second Suicide is one of the leading causes of death in the US, with more than 45,000 people dying by suicide in 2020. Experts recommend many strategies and treatments to decrease the risk of suicide, including psychotherapy, peer support, economic support, and medications like antidepressants. Few if any would be likely to put folic acid supplements on that list, but a recent study done at the University of Chicago may change that. The study, published in JAMA Psychiatry on September 28th, used data from the health insurance claims of 866,586 patients and looked at the relationship between folic acid […]
Read more » Study finds folic acid treatment is associated with decreased risk of suicide attempts

Cystic fibrosis patients can benefit from vitamin supplements, Oregon State research shows

Read Time:3 Minute, 17 Second CORVALLIS, Ore. – Cystic fibrosis patients who supplement their diet with vitamin C can also derive greater benefit from another antioxidant, vitamin E, resulting in a reduction in damaging inflammation, a study led by Oregon State University suggests. The findings, published in the journal Nutrients, are important because more than 160,000 people worldwide suffer from cystic fibrosis, which is characterized by lung inflammation and airway-blocking mucous buildup. The life-shortening condition is associated with persistent lung infection and afflicts 40,000 people in the United States. About 1,000 new cases are diagnosed in the U.S. every year, most […]
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Did the pandemic change our personalities?

Read Time:2 Minute, 54 Second Despite a long-standing hypothesis that personality traits are relatively impervious to environmental pressures, the COVID-19 pandemic may have altered the trajectory of personality across the United States, especially in younger adults, according to a new study published this week in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Angelina Sutin of Florida State University College of Medicine, and colleagues. Previous studies have generally found no associations between collective stressful events—such as earthquakes and hurricanes—and personality change. However, the coronavirus pandemic has affected the entire globe and nearly every aspect of life. In the new study, the researchers used longitudinal […]

Coffee drinking is associated with increased longevity

Read Time:3 Minute, 59 Second Sophia Antipolis, 27 September 2022:  Drinking two to three cups of coffee a day is linked with a longer lifespan and lower risk of cardiovascular disease compared with avoiding coffee, according to research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the ESC.1 The findings applied to ground, instant and decaffeinated varieties. “In this large, observational study, ground, instant and decaffeinated coffee were associated with equivalent reductions in the incidence of cardiovascular disease and death from cardiovascular disease or any cause,” said study author Professor Peter Kistler of the Baker Heart and Diabetes Research […]
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Being lonely and unhappy accelerates aging more than smoking

Read Time:2 Minute, 45 Second Molecular damage accumulates and contributes to the development of aging-related frailty and serious diseases. In some people these molecular processes are more intense than in others, a condition commonly referred to as accelerated aging. Fortunately, the increased pace of aging may be detected before its disastrous consequences manifest by using digital models of aging (aging clocks). Such models can also be used to derive anti-aging therapies on individual and population levels. According to the latest article published in Aging-US, any anti-aging therapy needs to focus on one’s mental health as much as on one’s physical health. An […]
Read more » Being lonely and unhappy accelerates aging more than smoking

Research Brief: Similar medications cost more for humans compared to pets

Read Time:2 Minute, 39 Second MINNEAPOLIS/ST. PAUL (09/27/2022) — In a research letter published in JAMA Internal Medicine, University of Minnesota researchers compared the prices of 120 medications commonly used in humans and pets. The authors found the price of human medications was generally higher than the price of pet medications with the same ingredients at common human-equivalent doses. On average, the retail price of human medications was approximately 5.5 times higher than pet medications. Discounted prices for humans were higher than pet prices for more than 60% of medications. On average, discounted prices were 1.5 times higher for human medications than for […]
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Calcium supplementation in people under the age of 35 improves bone mass

Read Time:3 Minute, 39 Second The findings provide novel insights and new evidence on the benefits of calcium supplementation and suggest that people should pay more attention to their bone health at a young age. “Osteoporosis and fractures are important global public health problems, particularly in elderly women,” explains lead author Yupeng Liu, researcher at the School of Public Health and Management, Wenzhou Medical University, China. “However, although calcium supplementation has been widely used in older age to increase bone mass, a number of studies suggest that it is unlikely to translate into clinically meaningful reductions in fractures. On the […]
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Diet high in guar gum fibre limits inflammation, MS symptoms in mice

Read Time:2 Minute, 54 Second Diets high in guar gum, a common food additive and dietary fibre, limited inflammation and delayed the onset of multiple sclerosis (MS) symptoms in mice, according to new research by members of the University of British Columbia (UBC) Microbiology and Immunology department. “The rapid increase of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders in industrialized countries in the last few decades indicates dietary choices are one environmental factor contributing to incidence,” said Dr. Lisa Osborne, senior researcher on the study and an assistant professor with UBC Microbiology and Immunology. “Dietary fibres are potent modulators of immune responses and […]
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Can robots have morals? Robots’ decisions on forced medication evoke doubts

Read Time:2 Minute, 18 Second People accept human nurses overruling patient autonomy and deciding on forced medication, but this trust does not extend to nursing robots. A study recently completed at the University of Helsinki investigated people’s judgments towards decisions made by nursing robots. Based on the study, it seems that human sensitivity and empathy are required from AI-based medical applications in order for patients to consider their solutions and decisions as equally acceptable as those made by humans. “Research in moral psychology has paid little attention to patient autonomy or internal conflicts in medical ethics – especially from the […]
Read more » Can robots have morals? Robots’ decisions on forced medication evoke doubts

Melatonin’s Amazing Research Discoveries:  Episode 1102 FALL 2022

Read Time:43 Second Melatonin’s Amazing Research Discoveries:  Episode 1102 FALL 2022 Melatonin’s Amazing Research Discoveries:  Episode 1102 FALL 2022 Like vitamin D, melatonin is found throughout the body. Melatonin has been found in many tissues other than the pineal gland and gut mucosa, including the brain, retina, lens, cochlea, trachea, skin, liver, kidney, thyroid, pancreas, thymus, spleen, and reproductive tissues. It is present in nearly all bodily fluids: #melatonin #antioxidant #chronobiotic Minich DM, Henning M, Darley C, Fahoum M, Schuler CB, Frame J. Is Melatonin the “Next Vitamin D”?: A Review of Emerging Science, Clinical Uses, Safety, and Dietary Supplements. Nutrients. […]
Read more » Melatonin’s Amazing Research Discoveries:  Episode 1102 FALL 2022

A sarbecovirus found in Russian bats is capable of using human ACE2 to enter cells, and is resistant to the antibodies of people vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2

Read Time:1 Minute, 44 Second Abstract Spillover of sarbecoviruses from animals to humans has resulted in outbreaks of severe acute respiratory syndrome SARS-CoVs and the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Efforts to identify the origins of SARS-CoV-1 and -2 has resulted in the discovery of numerous animal sarbecoviruses–the majority of which are only distantly related to known human pathogens and do not infect human cells. The receptor binding domain (RBD) on sarbecoviruses engages receptor molecules on the host cell and mediates cell invasion. Here, we tested the receptor tropism and serological cross reactivity for RBDs from two sarbecoviruses found in Russian horseshoe […]
Read more » A sarbecovirus found in Russian bats is capable of using human ACE2 to enter cells, and is resistant to the antibodies of people vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2

Newly discovered COVID-like virus could infect humans, resist vaccines

Read Time:3 Minute, 32 Second A recently discovered virus in a Russian bat that is similar to SARS-CoV-2, the virus behind COVID-19, is likely capable of infecting humans and, if it were to spillover, is resistant to current vaccines. A team lead by researchers in Washington State University’s Paul G. Allen School for Global Health found spike proteins from the bat virus, named Khosta-2, can infect human cells and is resistant to both the monoclonal antibodies and serum from individuals vaccinated for SARS-CoV-2. Both Khosta-2 and SARS- CoV-2 belong to the same sub-category of coronaviruses known as sarbecoviruses. “Our research […]
Read more » Newly discovered COVID-like virus could infect humans, resist vaccines

National study calls into question COVID-diabetes link in young people

Read Time:7 Minute, 6 Second Scottish study of over 1.8 million people aged under 35 suggests that increased short-term type 1 diabetes risk after contracting COVID-19 is unlikely to be due to the infection itself, and may be partly explained by increased testing around the time of diabetes diagnosis *note this work will feature in an embargoed press conference at the meeting, see details below* *press release available in Spanish and Portuguese – see below* New research, being presented at this year’s European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Stockholm, Sweden (19-23 Sept), found that testing […]
Read more » National study calls into question COVID-diabetes link in young people

Join the challenge to explore the Moon!

Read Time:2 Minute, 25 Second Lunar enthusiasts of all ages are challenged to help identify features on the Moon that might pose a hazard to rovers or astronauts exploring the surface. The 2022 EXPLORE Lunar Data Challenge is focused on the Archytas Dome region, close to the Apollo 17 landing site where the last humans set foot on the Moon 50 years ago this December. The Machine Learning Lunar Data Challenge is open to students, researchers and professionals in areas related to planetary sciences, but also to anyone with expertise in data processing. There is also a Public Lunar Data Challenge to plot […]

Cold exposure could help combat type 2 diabetes, particularly if it provokes shivering

Read Time:6 Minute, 2 Second *press release available in Spanish and Portuguese – see below* New research, being presented at this year’s European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Stockholm, Sweden (19-23 Sept), finds that shivering during repeated exposure to cold improves glucose tolerance, decreases fasting blood sugar and blood fat levels, and markedly reduces blood pressure in overweight and obese adults. The preliminary study, by Adam Sellers, Sten van Beek, and colleagues from Maastricht University in The Netherlands, highlights the potential for repeated cold exposure that activates shivering as an alternative strategy to treat and […]
Read more » Cold exposure could help combat type 2 diabetes, particularly if it provokes shivering

SMART and NTU Singapore develop a quick test kit to determine a person’s immunity against COVID-19 and its variants

Read Time:8 Minute, 33 Second Singapore, 22 September 2022 – A team of scientists from the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), MIT’s research enterprise in Singapore, and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has developed a quick test kit that can tell if a person has immunity against COVID-19 and its variants, based on the antibodies detected in a blood sample. Different from ART test kits – which look for the presence of viral proteins produced during a COVID-19 infection to determine if a person is infected – this rapid point-of-care test kit is a serology test that measures antibodies made by the patient. […]
Read more » SMART and NTU Singapore develop a quick test kit to determine a person’s immunity against COVID-19 and its variants

Tiny swimming robots treat deadly pneumonia in mice

Read Time:4 Minute, 2 Second Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have developed microscopic robots, called microrobots, that can swim around in the lungs, deliver medication and be used to clear up life-threatening cases of bacterial pneumonia. In mice, the microrobots safely eliminated pneumonia-causing bacteria in the lungs and resulted in 100% survival. By contrast, untreated mice all died within three days after infection. The results are published Sept. 22 in Nature Materials. The microrobots are made of algae cells whose surfaces are speckled with antibiotic-filled nanoparticles. The algae provide movement, which allows the microrobots to swim around and […]
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Scientists have found a potential basis for a cure for coronavirus

Read Time:2 Minute, 2 Second Researchers found out that salen is able effectively bind a number of proteins of the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. Scientists used the method of molecular docking and discovered, that salen shows activity to the non-structural protein nsp14, which prevents the destruction of the virus. New finding can be useful for new drugs creation and effective treatments for coronavirus infection. The results of the study are published in the Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds. “Our study focused on a well-known compound, salen. We tried to assess the potential activity of this compound against a series of proteins of the SARS-CoV-2, which cause the […]
Read more » Scientists have found a potential basis for a cure for coronavirus

A handful of universities seem to control flow of ideas, people in academia

Read Time:4 Minute, 9 Second Just five U.S. universities have trained 1-in-8 tenure-track faculty members serving at the nation’s institutions of higher learning, according to new University of Colorado Boulder research. The study, published Sept. 21 in the journal Nature, takes the most exhaustive look yet at the structure of the American professoriate—capturing data on nearly 300,000 tenure-track faculty (including where they received their own graduate degrees) at more than 10,000 university departments at 368 PhD-granting institutions from 2011 to 2020. The study reveals that in all fields of academia, most professors come from a small number of institutions. “We all know […]
Read more » A handful of universities seem to control flow of ideas, people in academia