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  • A new book  reveals President Kennedy was a secret admirer of the Nazis
  • Embarrassingly close to visit being paid to Berlin  next month by Obama
  • Comes one  week before 50th anniversary commemorations of JFK’s memorable ‘Ich bin ein  Berliner’ speech pledging US solidarity with Europe

By  Allan Hall

PUBLISHED: 06:39 EST, 23 May  2013 |  UPDATED: 10:24  EST, 23 May 2013

A new book out in Germany reveals how  President Kennedy was a secret admirer of the Nazis.

The news comes embarrassingly close to a  visit being paid to Berlin next month by President Obama – one week before 50th  anniversary commemorations of JFK’s memorable ‘Ich bin ein Berliner’ speech  pledging US solidarity with Europe during the Cold War.

President Kennedy’s travelogues and  letters  chronicling his wanderings through Germany before WWII, when  Adolf Hitler was  in power, have been unearthed and show him generally in  favour of the movement  that was to plunge the world into the greatest  war in history

President kennedyUNSPECIFIED - CIRCA 1920: Adolf Hitler (1889-1945), German statesman. (Photo by Roger Viollet/Getty Images)

Secret: A new book out in Germany reveals how President  Kennedy was a secret admirer of the Nazis

‘Fascism?’ wrote the youthful president-to-be  in one. ‘The right thing for Germany.’

In another; ‘What are the evils of fascism  compared to communism?’

And on August 21, 1937 – two years before the  war that would claim 50 million lives broke out – he wrote: ‘The Germans really  are too good – therefore people have ganged up on them to protect themselves.’

And in a line which seems directly plugged  into the racial superiority line plugged by the Third Reich he wrote after  travelling through the Rhineland: ‘The Nordic races certainly seem to be  superior to the Romans.’

The future president’s praise is now  embarrassing in hindsight – a few years later he fought in War  War Two against  the Nazis and his elder brother Lt.  Joseph Patrick ‘Joe’ Kennedy, Jr was killed.

Revealing: Presidential diaries and photographs are among more than 500 items from a collection John F. Kennedy documents and artifactsRevealing: Presidential diaries and photographs are  among more than 500 items from a collection of John F. Kennedy documents and  artifacts
John F. Kennedy juggles on a street in Amsterdam during a trip to Europe,1937 --- John F. Kennedy recovers from jaundice in a London hospital in 1937. --- Image by CORBIS

Tour: Kennedy recovers, right, from jaundice in a London  hospital in 1937 and left juggles on a street in Amsterdam during a trip to  Europe

Trip: Kennedy and one of his sisters ride camels in Egypt in 1939Trip: Kennedy and one of his sisters ride camels in  Egypt in 1939

‘I CAN IMAGINE NO MORE  REWARDING A CAREER’: JOHN F KENNEDY’S MILITARY SERVICE

Framed together are the Navy Marine Corps Medal and the Purple Hearttial

As a young man, the future president had  desperately wanted to go into the Navy but was originally rejected – mainly due  to a back injury he sustained playing football while attending  Harvard.

In 1941, though, his politically connected  father Joe P Kennedy used his influence to get him in to the service and he  joined the Navy.

In 1942, Kennedy volunteered for PT  (motorized torpedo) boat duty in the Pacific.

On 12 June 1944 he received the Navy’s  highest honor for gallantry for his heroic actions as a gunboat pilot during  World War II.

The Navy Marine Corps Medal and the Purple  Heart were presented to Lt. Kennedy for his heroics and injuries sustained in  the rescue of the crew of PT 109 during on August 2, 1943 when the motor torpedo  boat was struck by a Japanese destroyer.

His back was hurt during duty and Kennedy was  released from all active duty and finally retired from the U.S. Naval Reserve on  physical disability in March 1945.

‘I can  imagine  no more rewarding a career. And any man who may be asked in this century what he  did to make his life worthwhile, I think can respond  with a good deal of pride  and satisfaction: I served in the United  States Navy.’

John F Kennedy

Source:  History.com

Other musings concern how great the autobahns  were – ‘the best roads in the world’ – and how, having visited Hitler’s Bavarian  holiday home in Berchtesgaden and the tea house built on top of the mountain for  him.

He declared; ‘Who has visited these two  places can easily imagine how Hitler will emerge from the hatred currently  surrounding him to emerge in a few years as one of the most important  personalities that ever lived.’

Kennedy’s admiration for Nazi Germany is  revealed in a book entitled ‘John F. Kennedy – Among the Germans. Travel diaries  and letters 1937-1945.’

When World War II did arrive, the future  president’s father, Joe P Kennedy, strongly opposed going into battle with  Germany and made several missteps that severely damaged his political career.

He adopted a defeatist,  anti-war stance and tried to arrange a  meeting with Adolf Hitler without the approval of the Department of  State.

The reasons for this are unclear – some  speculate he was eager to do anything to avoid war because he feared that  American capitalism – which he profited from – would not survive the country’s  entry into the conflict.

In his role as US ambassador to Britain he  also opposed providing the UK with military and economic aid.

He said in an interview ‘Democracy is  finished in England. It may be here [in the US].

During the World War II, JFK’s older brother  Joe volunteered for a secret mission testing an experimental drone plane packed  with explosives – a weapon the Allies hoped to use as a guided missile.

On the first test flight, the explosives  detonated prematurely and the plane exploded – his body was never  found.

Studies: The future American president sits at a typewriter, holding open his published thesis, 'Why England Slept'Studies: The future American president sits at a  typewriter, holding open his published thesis, ‘Why England Slept’
John F. Kennedy and his father, Joseph P. Kennedy, US Ambassador to Great Britain, board an Air France plane at Croydon AirportJohn F. Kennedy and his father, Joseph P. Kennedy, US Ambassador to Great Britain, board an Air France plane at Croydon Airport

March 1939, London, John F. Kennedy and his father,  Joseph P. Kennedy, US Ambassador to Great Britain, board an Air France plane at  Croydon Airport. He accompanied his father to Rome, where he will be  representing President Roosevelt at the coronation of Pope Pius XII

Pals: Kennedy and Lem Billings, right, who was a classmate from the Choate School and Princeton University, outside a drugstore in the mid 1930sPals: Kennedy and Lem Billings, right, who was a  classmate from the Choate School and Princeton University, outside a drugstore  in the mid 1930s
ca. 1932 --- John F. Kennedy, Travel companion: Kennedy, Dunker the dog, and Lem  Billings at the Hague, during their Europe trip

The youthful president carved his own place  in history when he stood  outside the West Berlin town hall of Schoeneberg on  June 26 1963 to  declare US solidarity with the city and the continent with the  immortal  words; ‘Ich bin ein Berliner.’

The fact that, strictly speaking, he was  referring to himself as a doughnut – a Berliner – did not diminish the wild  enthusiasm for him.

But his praise of Hitler in a country still  struggling to come to terms  with his legacy may prove awkward for Obama who  will visit Berlin for  wide-ranging talks with Chancellor Merkel on June 18 and  19.

President kennedyUS President John F. Kennedy at the Schoeneberg Town  Hall during his visit to Germany. The youthful president carved his own place in  history when he stood outside the West Berlin town hall on June 26 1963 to  declare US solidarity with the city and the continent with the immortal words;  ‘Ich bin ein Berliner’
Infamous: One of President Kennedy's speech cards carrying his famous remark 'Ich bin ein Berline', which he delivered in a speech that electrified an adoring crowd in BerlinInfamous: One of President Kennedy’s speech cards  carrying his famous remark ‘Ich bin ein Berline’, which he delivered in a speech  that electrified an adoring crowd in BerlinFans: Thousands of citizens lined the main street in West Berlin as the president arrived flanked by police and bodyguards

Fans: Thousands of citizens lined the main street in  West Berlin as the president arrived flanked by police and bodyguards

Farewell: President John F. Kennedy waves goodbye as he leaves Berlin for Ireland

Farewell: President John F. Kennedy waves goodbye as he  leaves Berlin for Ireland

But his praise was not entirely without  caveats.

‘It is evident that the Germans were scary  for him,’ said Spiegel magazine in Berlin.

In the diaries of the  three trips he made  to prewar Germany he also recognised; ‘Hitler seems  to be as popular here as  Mussolini in Germany, although propaganda is  probably his most powerful  weapon.’

Observers say his writings ranged between  aversion and attraction for Germany.

The book also contains his impressions when  walking through a shattered  Berlin after the war: ‘An overwhelming stench of  bodies – sweet and  nauseating’.

And of the recently deceased Fuehrer he said;  ‘His boundless ambition for his  country made him a threat to peace in the  world, but he had something  mysterious about him. He was the stuff of legends.’

The book editor’s believe that he was ‘eerily  fascinated’ by fascism.

 US President Barack ObamaLeading lady: German chancellor Angela Merkel has been named the most powerful woman in the world by business magazine Forbes for the third year running

Bad timing: The news comes embarrassingly close to a  visit being paid to Berlin next month by President Obama – one week before 50th  anniversary commemorations of JFK’s memorable ‘Ich bin ein Berliner’ speech  pledging US solidarity with Europe during the Cold War

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2329556/How-JFK-secretly-ADMIRED-Hitler-Explosive-book-reveals-Presidents-praise-Nazis-travelled-Germany-Second-World-War.html#ixzz2U9FJu0um Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook