Month: February 2015

Scientists discover robust evidence that chronic fatigue syndrome is a biological illness

PUBLIC RELEASE: 27-FEB-2015 Immune signatures in blood point to distinct disease stages, open door to better diagnosis and treatment COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY’S MAILMAN SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH Researchers at the Center for Infection and Immunity at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health identified distinct immune changes in patients diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome, known medically…

Research shows Asian herb holds promise as treatment for Ebola virus disease

PUBLIC RELEASE: 26-FEB-2015 Research published in Science finds new cellular factor critical to Ebola virus infection, discovered small molecule that inhibits virus entry into cell TEXAS BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE SAN ANTONIO (February 26, 2015) – New research that focuses on the mechanism by which Ebola virus infects a cell and the discovery of a promising…

Omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D may control brain serotonin

PUBLIC RELEASE: 26-FEB-2015 Affecting behavior and psychiatric disorders CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL & RESEARCH CENTER OAKLAND Oakland, CA (February 26, 2015) – Although essential marine omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D have been shown to improve cognitive function and behavior in the context of certain brain disorders, the underlying mechanism has been unclear. In a new paper…

Researchers identify how humans can develop immunity to deadly Marburg virus

PUBLIC RELEASE: 26-FEB-2015 UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS MEDICAL BRANCH AT GALVESTON A collaborative team from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Vanderbilt University and The Scripps Research Institute have identified mechanisms involved in antibody response to the deadly Marburg virus by studying the blood of a Marburg survivor. This study now appears online and…

How public water can contribute to obesity and more

How public water can contribute to obesity and more Water fluoridation linked to higher rates of underactive thyroid – The clear association found in our analyses between fluoride levels in drinking water and variations in hypothyroidism prevalence appears to confirm findings in earlier studies that ingestion of fluoride affects thyroid function.The fact that the difference…

One in 3 women could potentially be spared chronic pain after breast cancer surgery

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015 TORONTO, Feb. 25, 2015 – One in every three women undergoing a mastectomy could potentially be spared chronic post-operative pain if anesthesiologists used a regional anesthetic technique in combination with standard care, according to a new study. Standard care for mastectomies is a general anesthetic, whereby anesthesiologists use gas to keep the…

Oat breakfast cereals may contain a common mold-related toxin

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015 American Chemical Society Oats are often touted for boosting heart health, but scientists warn that the grain and its products might need closer monitoring for potential mold contamination. They report in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that some oat-based breakfast cereals in the U.S. contain a mold-related toxin called ochratoxin…

Decline in smoking rates may increase lung cancer mortality

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015 ROCHESTER, Minn. — A decline in smoking rates may mean that many people who could have benefited from early detection of lung cancer are dying because they don’t qualify for low-dose CT scans, according to a group of Mayo Clinic researchers. Their research appears in the Feb. 24 issue of JAMA, the…

Garlic extract could help cystic fibrosis patients fight infection 

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015 A chemical found in garlic can kill bacteria that cause life-threatening lung infections in people with cystic fibrosis, research suggests. The study is the first to show that the chemical – known as allicin – could be an effective treatment against a group of infectious bacteria that is highly resistant to most…

Easy on the eyes: How eyelash length keeps your eyes healthy

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015 Study finds that animals and humans have similar lash length It started with a trip to the basement of the American Museum of Natural History in New York to inspect preserved animal hides. Later, Georgia Institute of Technology researchers built a wind tunnel about 2 feet tall, complete with a makeshift eye.…

Marine oil supplement has positive effects on post-exercise muscle damage

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015 BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — An Indiana University study has revealed that there may be a greater connection between mussels and muscles than previously thought. The study, by kinesiology professor Timothy Mickleborough at the IU School of Public Health-Bloomington, found that taking a pre-exercise supplement of the omega-3 PCSO-524, a marine oil lipid derived…

Baby formula poses higher arsenic risk to newborns than breast milk, Dartmouth study shows

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015 Dartmouth College HANOVER, N.H. – In the first U.S. study of urinary arsenic in babies, Dartmouth College researchers found that formula-fed infants had higher arsenic levels than breast-fed infants, and that breast milk itself contained very low arsenic concentrations. The findings appear Feb. 23 online in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives. A…

Vitamin D deficiency linked more closely to diabetes than obesity

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015 Study finds direct correlation between low vitamin D levels, glucose metabolism The Endocrine Society Washington, DC–People who have low levels of vitamin D are more likely to have diabetes, regardless of how much they weigh, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. The…

Sauna use associated with reduced risk of cardiac, all-cause mortality

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015 The JAMA Network Journals A sauna may do more than just make you sweat. A new study suggests men who engaged in frequent sauna use had reduced risks of fatal cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality, according to an article published online by JAMA Internal Medicine. Although some studies have found sauna bathing…

Water fluoridation in England linked to higher rates of underactive thyroid

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015 Switch to other approaches in bid to protect tooth health, say researchers BMJ Water fluoridation above a certain level is linked to 30 per cent higher than expected rates of underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism) in England, suggests research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health. The findings prompt the researchers…

Study finds peanut consumption in infancy prevents peanut allergy

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015 NIH-funded trial compares consumption and avoidance of peanut NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Introduction of peanut products into the diets of infants at high risk of developing peanut allergy was safe and led to an 81 percent reduction in the subsequent development of the allergy, a clinical trial has found.…

Your privacy online: Health information at serious risk of abuse

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015 Annenberg research uncovers privacy risks from surfing health web sites University of Pennsylvania Annenberg School for Communication There is a significant risk to your privacy whenever you visit a health-related web page. An analysis of over 80,000 such web pages shows that nine out of ten visits result in personal health information…

Sobering effect of the love hormone

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015 University of Sydney Oxytocin, sometimes referred to as the ‘love’ or ‘cuddle’ hormone, has a legendary status in popular culture due to its vital role in social and sexual behaviour and long-term bonding. Now researchers from the University of Sydney and the University of Regensburg have discovered it also has a remarkable…