Month: January 2017

Brain-computer interface allows completely locked-in people to communicate

Public Release: 31-Jan-2017   Completely locked-in participants report being ‘happy’ PLOS IMAGE: This is the NIRS/EEG brain computer interface system shown on a model. Credit: Wyss Center, http://www.wysscenter.ch A brain-computer interface that can decipher the thoughts of people who are unable to communicate could revolutionize the lives of those living with completely locked-in syndrome, according…

Yeast mutants unlock the secrets of aging

Public Release: 31-Jan-2017   Two Concordia studies identify mechanisms that shorten longevity and can be targeted by natural chemicals to improve health and extend human lifespan Concordia University   Montreal, January 31, 2017 — Yeast — it’s more than just a fungus. It can also tell us a lot about growing older. That’s because aging…

Antibiotics shown to stimulate bad bacteria growth by 300%

Public Release: 30-Jan-2017   University of Exeter IMAGE: These are two types of lab E. coli smeared across an agar plate. The green ones are drug resistant and the blue ones are not. Credit: The University of Exeter The growth of bacteria can be stimulated by antibiotics, scientists at the University of Exeter have discovered.…

Anticancer properties of mono/di-halogenated coumarins

Public Release: 30-Jan-2017   This research article by Dr. Kabange Kasumbwe et al. has been published in Anti-Cancer Agents in Medicinal Chemistry, Volume 17, Issue 2, 2017 Bentham Science Publishers   IMAGE: Coumarins are naturally occurring plant metabolites known for their various pharmacological properties such as anticoagulant, antimicrobial, anticancer, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiviral properties. Credit:…

Research Breakthroughs 30 JAN 2017

1. Some early breast cancer patients benefit more from breast conservation than from mastectomy 2. Rat-grown mouse pancreases help reverse diabetes in mice 3. Corn turning French hamsters into deranged cannibals: research

Some early breast cancer patients benefit more from breast conservation than from mastectomy

Public Release: 29-Jan-2017   ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Breast conserving therapy (BCT, breast conserving surgery combined with radiation therapy) is superior to mastectomy in certain types of breast cancer patients, according to results from the largest study to date, to be presented to the European Cancer Congress 2017 [1] today (Monday). Professor…

Rebalancing gut microbiome lengthens survival in mouse model of ALS

Public Release: 27-Jan-2017   University of Illinois at Chicago A bacterial by-product known to be important in maintaining gut health may slow the progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS – a progressive, neurodegenerative disease. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine report that in a mouse model of ALS, the…

Anti-inflammatory diet could reduce risk of bone loss in women

Public Release: 26-Jan-2017   Study also found diet linked to fewer hip fractures in younger white women Ohio State University COLUMBUS, Ohio – Anti-inflammatory diets — which tend to be high in vegetables, fruits, fish and whole grains — could boost bone health and prevent fractures in some women, a new study suggests. Researchers examined…

Rat-grown mouse pancreases help reverse diabetes in mice

Public Release: 25-Jan-2017 Stanford University Medical Center Rat-grown mouse pancreases help reverse diabetes in mice, say researchers at Stanford, University of Tokyo Mouse pancreases grown in rats generate functional, insulin-producing cells that can reverse diabetes when transplanted into mice with the disease, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and the Institute…

Antibiotics, not dirty hospitals, the main cause of C. difficile epidemic

Public Release: 24-Jan-2017   University of Oxford   The study concluded that overuse of antibiotics like ciprofloxacin led to the outbreak of severe diarrhoea caused by C. difficile that hit headlines from 2006 onwards. The outbreak was stopped by substantially reducing use of ciprofloxacin and related antibiotics. Inappropriate use and widespread over prescribing of fluoroquinolone…

Natural compound could improve treatment of triple-negative breast cancer

Public Release: 24-Jan-2017   University of Missouri-Columbia More than 100 women die from breast cancer every day in the United States. Triple-negative breast cancers, which comprise 15 to 20 percent of all breast tumors, are a particularly deadly type of breast disease that often metastasize to distant sites. Now, University of Missouri researchers have found…

Cookware made with scrap metal contaminates food

Public Release: 23-Jan-2017 Study across 10 countries warns of lead and other toxic metals OK International     IMAGE: Lead and other metals leach from cookware during cooking. SAN FRANCISCO – Aluminum cookware made from scrap metal in countries around the world poses a serious and previously unrecognized health risk to millions of people according…

ASU gut microbe study shows promise as a potential treatment for autism

Public Release: 23-Jan-2017   Arizona State University The key to fighting autism might lie not in the mind, but in the gut. A team led by Arizona State University researchers is taking a novel approach the search for effective autism treatments by focusing on improving the gut microbiome through fecal microbial transplants. Early results are…

How nicotine acts on the brains of schizophrenic patients

Public Release: 23-Jan-2017   Institut Pasteur   Several studies have indicated that schizophrenic patients are likely to show a high level of nicotine dependence. Scientists from the Institut Pasteur, the CNRS, Inserm and the ENS used a mouse model to elucidate the mechanism of action of nicotine on cells in the prefrontal cortex. They visualized…

Breakthrough Research for 23 JAN 2017

1. A natural compound can block the formation of toxins associated with Parkinson’s Disease 2. Protein isolated from baker’s yeast shows potential against leukemia cells 3. Asthma not found in high percentage of adults who were previously diagnosed

Asthma not found in high percentage of adults who were previously diagnosed

Public Release: 17-Jan-2017   The JAMA Network Journals   Among adults with a previous physician diagnosis of asthma, a current diagnosis could not be established in about one-third who were not using daily asthma medications or had medications weaned, according to a study appearing in the January 17 issue of JAMA. The researchers speculate that…

Millions of people with metabolic syndrome may need more vitamin E. Conventional vitamin E blood tests as they are now being done are useless.

Public Release: 17-Jan-2017   “This basically means that conventional vitamin E blood tests as they are now being done are useless.” Oregon State University   IMAGE: These are vitamin E supplements. Credit: Photo by John Liu, courtesy of Oregon State University CORVALLIS, Ore. – New research has shown that people with metabolic syndrome need significantly…

Protein isolated from baker’s yeast shows potential against leukemia cells

Public Release: 17-Jan-2017   Researchers performed in vitro trials to test the effect of L-asparaginase on acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells and published the results in Scientific Reports Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo An enzyme identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, commonly known as brewer’s or baker’s yeast, has passed in vitro trials,…