Antibiotic use in infants linked to asthma

Public release date: 11-Jun-2007     Infants lacking dog exposure have double asthma risk   (NORTHBROOK, IL, JUNE 11, 2007) – New research indicates that children who receive antibiotics before their first birthday are significantly more likely to develop asthma by age 7. The study, published in the June issue of CHEST, the peer-reviewed journal…

New study: Pycnogenol reduces heart failure

Public release date: 16-May-2007 A study to be published in an upcoming edition of the journal of Cardiovascular Toxicology reveals Pycnogenol natural pine bark extract from the French maritime pine tree, helps prevent damage that high blood pressure causes to the heart. The study demonstrates Pycnogenol counteracts the “wearing out” of the heart, which may…

CAM-oriented primary care providers result in cost savings, high patient satisfaction

Public release date: 7-Jun-2007     Researchers found that over the course of the seven-year study, patients visiting chiropractors and other CAM-oriented PCPs had 60 percent fewer hospitalizations, 62 percent fewer outpatient surgical cases, and 85 percent lower pharmaceutical costs when compared with total network HMO utilization rates and costs. The chiropractors and other CAM…

Studies link insurance coverage to more advanced cancers

Public release date: 11-Jun-2007 Two new studies find the uninsured and people with certain types of public health insurance are more likely to be diagnosed with more advanced cancer compared to those with private insurance. The studies, published in the July 15, 2007 issue of CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, find…

Experts say many in Britain malnourished

Jun 8, 7:53 PM ET 2007 Many nutrition experts believe the number of malnourished Britons is closer to 4 million, about 6 percent of the population, than the government’s estimate of 2 million. There are no statistics on how many obese people may be malnourished, but doctors say they are seeing patients who are both…

Drug company funding of drug trials greatly influences outcome

In head-to-head trials of two drugs, the one deemed better appears to depend largely on who is funding the study, according to an analysis of nearly 200 statin-drug comparisons carried out between 1999 and 2005. UCSF researchers examined 192 published results of trials comparing one cholesterol-lowering statin drug to another, or to a non-statin drug.…

Published study shows benefits of Diachrome for people with type 2 diabetes.

Public release date: 8-Jan-2007   Additional research presented at the 19th World Diabetes Congress Meeting supports the efficacy and safety of chromium picolinate in diabetes management   The 30-day study examined thirty-six overweight or obese poorly controlled patients with type 2 diabetes taking Diachrome who were already receiving oral anti-diabetic drug(s). The results also showed…

Hot flashes may be welcome sign in women with breast cancer, study says

CHICAGO, June 4, 2007 — Women on tamoxifen therapy who reported having hot flashes were less likely to develop recurrent breast cancer than those who did not report hot flashes, according to a study from the Moores Cancer Center at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). Moreover, hot flashes were a stronger predictor of…

Herb shows potential to reduce cancer-related fatigue

North Central Cancer Treatment Group reports on pilot ginseng study CHICAGO — North Central Cancer Treatment Group (NCCTG) researchers, based at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., have generated preliminary data suggesting that a form of American ginseng provides greater improvements in fatigue and vitality in patients who receive the highest doses tested, compared to lower…

Flaxseed stunts the growth of prostate tumors

Public release date: 2-Jun-2007 DURHAM, N.C. — Flaxseed, an edible seed that is rich in omega 3-fatty acids and fiber-related compounds known as lignans, is effective in halting prostate tumor growth, according to a study led by Duke University Medical Center researchers. The seed, which is similar to a sesame seed, may be able to…

Folic Acid Supplements Cut Stroke Risk

  Folic acid supplementation may reduce the risk of stroke by 18 percent or more, but it’s not clear whether it boosts outcomes for other cardiovascular conditions, researchers say.   For the new research, a U.S. team reviewed eight studies of folic acid supplementation, which lowers concentrations of homocysteine in the blood. High homocysteine levels…

Ads for SSRI antidepressants are misleading, say researchers

Consumer ads for a class of antidepressants called SSRIs often claim that depression is due to a chemical imbalance in the brain, and that SSRIs correct this imbalance, but these claims are not supported by scientific evidence, say researchers in PLoS Medicine. Although scientists in the 1960s suggested that depression may be linked to low…

A Common Microbe Could Help To Trigger Alzheimers

  A COMMON microbe could help to trigger Alzheimer’s disease, say researchers in the US. If true, their controversial claim could turn the multimillion-dollar field of Alzheimer’s research on its head and force a rethink on how to prevent the disease. The microbe in question is Chlamydia pneumoniae, which is spread by coughs and sneezes.…