Month: October 2015

Allergy is the price we pay for our immunity to parasites

Public Release: 29-Oct-2015 PLOS New findings, published in PLOS Computational Biology, help demonstrate the evolutionary basis for allergy. Molecular similarities in food and environmental proteins that cause allergy (such as pollen), and multicellular parasites (such as parasitic worms), have been identified systematically for the first time. A study led by Dr Nicholas Furnham (London School…

Studies raise questions about impact of statins on flu vaccination in seniors

Public Release: 29-Oct-2015 Findings suggest statin use may hinder immune response, vaccine effectiveness Infectious Diseases Society of America A new pair of studies suggests that statins, drugs widely used to reduce cholesterol, may have a detrimental effect on the immune response to influenza vaccine and the vaccine’s effectiveness at preventing serious illness in older adults.…

The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology: Large meta-analysis finds low-fat diets ineffective for achieving long-term weight loss

Public Release: 29-Oct-2015   The Lancet Low-fat diets do not lead to greater weight loss in the long term compared to higher-fat diets (eg, low-carbohydrate or Mediterranean diets) of similar intensity, according to a large meta-analysis involving more than 68000 adults, published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal. “There is no good evidence for…

Study shows association between breastfeeding and reduced risk of aggressive breast cancer

Public Release: 27-Oct-2015   New meta-analysis shows lower incidence of hormone receptor negative breast cancer in women who breastfed American Cancer Society A large international study shows that breastfeeding is associated with a lower risk of developing an aggressive form of breast cancer called hormone-receptor negative. This new combined evidence shows the risk was reduced…

Some commercial coffees contain high levels of mycotoxins

Public Release: 28-Oct-2015   FECYT – Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology An analysis of one hundred coffees sold in Spain has confirmed the presence of mycotoxins -toxic metabolites produced by fungi. In addition, five of the samples that were tested were found to contain ochratoxin A, the only legislated mycotoxin, in amounts that exceeded…

Natural Mosquito Repellants, Study

Ralph Turchiano

We look at a recent study ( 28 OCT 2015 ) of how a few types of natural mosquito repellents stacked up to DEET. The study yielded some very interesting surprises, as well as over turn a commonly held assumption. Mosquito types tested: Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus), yellow fever mosquito (Aedes aegypti) * This…

Lower doses of common product ingredient might increase breast cancer risk

Public Release: 27-Oct-2015 Safety tests may be underestimating chemicals’ potency Silent Spring Institute Estrogen-mimicking chemicals called parabens, which are commonly found in an array of personal care products, may be more dangerous at lower doses than previously thought, according to a new study. The findings, published online October 27 in Environmental Health Perspectives, could have…

Obese children’s health rapidly improves with sugar reduction unrelated to calories

Public Release: 27-Oct-2015   Study indicates that calories are not created equal; sugar and fructose are dangerous University of California – San Francisco   Reducing consumption of added sugar, even without reducing calories or losing weight, has the power to reverse a cluster of chronic metabolic diseases, including high cholesterol and blood pressure, in children…

Study: Low-weight, high-repetition exercise increases bone density up to 8 percent in adults

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015   Findings defy prior assumptions that heavy weightlifting is necessary for building bone mass Portavoce Public Relations BALTIMORE – October 26, 2015 – A new research study published in The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness finds that low-weight, high-repetition resistance training increases bone mineral density in adults, challenging assumptions that…

York U researchers list products expectant mothers should avoid during first trimester

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015   The list is long and includes cleaning solvents, pesticides, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs York University TORONTO, October 26, 2015 — Expectant mothers in their first trimester should avoid certain cosmetics, cleaning agents and medicines, to protect the developing fetal brain from chemicals that can trigger autism, York U health researchers have found.…

Green office environments linked with higher cognitive function scores

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015   Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Boston, MA – People who work in well-ventilated offices with below-average levels of indoor pollutants and carbon dioxide (CO2) have significantly higher cognitive functioning scores–in crucial areas such as responding to a crisis or developing strategy–than those who work in offices with typical levels,…

Study finds medication errors, adverse drug events in 1 out of 2 surgeries studied

Public Release: 25-Oct-2015 “Overall, it was determined that 124 of the 277 observed operations included at least one medication error or adverse drug event” Massachusetts General Hospital The first study to measure the incidence of medication errors and adverse drug events during the perioperative period – immediately before, during and right after a surgical procedure…

Common shoulder dislocation can heal just as well without surgery: Study

Public Release: 22-Oct-2015 St. Michael’s Hospital TORONTO, Oct. 22, 2015–Acromio-clavicular joint dislocation is one of the most common shoulder injuries orthopedic surgeons treat. Severe dislocations are often treated with surgery, but patients who opt for non-surgical treatment typically experience fewer complications and return to work sooner, according to new research published today in the Journal…

Vitamin B3 derivative cuts risk of new skin cancers

Public Release: 21-Oct-2015   New research — New England Journal of Medicine University of Sydney A year of treatment with nicotinamide, a form of vitamin B3, significantly lowered the risk of common, non-melanoma skin cancer in high-risk patients, according to University of Sydney research published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. All 386…

How diet may affect the progression of multiple sclerosis

Public Release: 21-Oct-2015   Ruhr-University Bochum Dietary fatty acids affect the development and progression of autoimmune chronic-inflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis. In a collaborative study between the Departments of Neurology at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum (St. Josef-Hospital) and the Friedrich Alexander Universtiy Erlangen, researchers now found that long-chain fatty acids promote the development and propagation…

Children who take antibiotics gain weight faster than kids who don’t

Public Release: 21-Oct-2015   New study suggests that repeated antibiotic use could lead to higher BMI long term Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health Kids who receive antibiotics throughout the course of their childhoods gain weight significantly faster than those who do not, according to new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health…

Discrepancies are common between reported medical outcomes and trial registry data

Public Release: 20-Oct-2015 “From 2005 to 2014, we found that only 26 percent of randomized trials published in core headache journals were compliant with trial registration requirements, and that 38 percent of registered trials published results that did not match what authors initially planned to report,” Study covering clinical trial publications about headaches finds significant…

Systematic review examines potential health benefits of pear consumption

Public Release: 20-Oct-2015   In vitro, animal, clinical and epidemiologic studies indicate pear consumption potentially improves gut health and set the stage for further evidence of associated health benefits Edelman Public Relations PORTLAND, Ore. – Oct. 20, 2015 – To explore the potential health benefits associated with pear consumption and related health outcomes, Joanne Slavin,…